Whoopi Goldberg shuts down white co-host; ‘What do you know about black history?’

The View 2

First, Stacey Dash was accused of abandoning her “melanin;” now, the women of “The View” are accusing her of abandoning her values.

The ladies of “The View” were discussing Dash’s controversial statements — which were sparked by the “white” Oscars — when one co-host was debunked for asking the simple question if Dash may have made a point.

It should come as no surprise that host Whoopi Goldberg was highly irritated by the fact that Fox News’ Dash suggested that the Black Entertainment Network and Black History Month are doing more to segregate society than to unite it.

The controversy arose when Dash flatly rejected the idea of boycotting the “racist” Oscars, which many entertainers have already embargoed because they say is too “white,” (even this GOP candidate has joined the conversation).

‘The View” co-host Sunny Hostin accused Dash of abandoning her values in order to pander to an audience that is “angry and scared of people that don’t look like them.”

That would be the “Fox News” audience for anyone who needs catching up.

Much like the white comedian who came under fire Wednesday after saying Dash wasn’t black anymore for having an independent thought, Hostin accused Dash of compromising “her values for money.”

The only explanation, according to Hostin, for Dash’s change of heart – Dash was once regular on the BET network – could be the almighty dollar.

But the discussion really lit up when ABC reporter and co-host, Paula Faris, set the discussion on fire with one question.

“Is it subconsciously,” she began, referring to Dash’s assertion about black-only organizations, “creating a divide amongst us and pitting one group against the next. I’m just asking the question?”

Big mistake to ask a question in that lioness den, Faris.

“No. No it’s not, Paula,” Hostin immediately pounced. “The bottom line is the reason there is a Black History Month is that as far as I remember, when I was in school, I knew nothing about my history. I wasn’t taught about my history.”

Then it was Goldberg’s turn.

“What do you know about black history?” Goldberg condescendingly asked Faris.

When Faris couldn’t sufficiently answer the question to Goldberg’s liking, she received a scolding: “Yes, we’re all Americans, but we’re all not treated like Americans,” Goldberg said.

Goldberg made the argument that American history lumps everybody together, and pointed out that Asian history, as it pertains to America, isn’t taught either.

So, we should have separate American history lessons for every ethnicity? That doesn’t sound divisive at all!

Watch the contentious exchange below:

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