Muslim kid’s ‘invented’ clock traced to 1980s model; ‘You didn’t build that’

The story of Ahmed Mohamed, the 14-year-old Texas student who was arrested and briefly held for bringing what he called a “homemade” digital clock to school, could be falling apart at the seams.

The reason for the arrest was that the clock, which was housed inside a large pencil box with wires going every which way, looked suspiciously like a homemade bomb, with the actual clock appearing more to be a timing device.

After his release, Mohamed became an immediate darling of the left, and received numerous internship and job offers, an invitation to visit the White House, and an Islamic prayer vigil that was held for him at his school.

A video recently surfaced on YouTube making the case that there was nothing “homemade” about the clock art all. It was nothing more than a commercially available digital clock that was not assembled by a teenager — but rather disassembled and placed into the case.

Watch the video here, posted by Thomas Talbot.

Another individual, who identified himself as an engineer took it into greater detail in a post on ArtVoiceReader, and was able to identify it. He wrote:

I found the highest resolution photograph of the clock I could. Instantly, I was disappointed. Somewhere in all of this – there has indeed been a hoax. Ahmed Mohamed didn’t invent his own alarm clock. He didn’t even build a clock.

Because of the crude (by modern standards) circuit board in Ahmed’s “invention,” the writer concluded that he was dealing with a vintage clock. He wrote:

So I turned to eBay, searching for vintage alarm clocks. It only took a minute to locate Ahmed’s clock. See this eBay listing, up at the time of this writing. Amhed’s clock was invented, and built, by Micronta, a Radio Shack subsidiary. Catalog number 63 756.

The writer, who identifies himself only as “Anthony,” goes into great detail about the size of the pencil case and that of the clock. He also posted a more precise identification of the clock that a reader had submitted. He found it on a 1986 Radio Shack catalog.

In a YouTube video Mohamed posted after his release, he claimed he’d been arrested for “a hoax bomb.” Looks more like the whole thing was a hoax.

Mohamed is starting to become something of a laughingstock on social media, with one Twitter user sarcastically comparing him to the small business owners Obama vilified in his infamous “you didn’t build that” speech from the 2012 campaign.

Here are a few other examples:

And as for the reason Mohamed was taken into custody, this tweet says it all.

And on that basis, it wouldn’t matter if the kid had blue eyes, blonde hair and he answered to the name Sven — he would’ve been taken in.

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