‘In God We Trust’ police decals not going away, sheriff has a ‘suggestion’ for atheist bullies

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Photo Credit Amarillo Globe-News

In an era of vicious anti-police rhetoric — and sometimes fatal assaults on men and women in uniform — more and more law enforcement agencies across the country are placing “In God We Trust” decals on their patrol vehicles.

In another growing trend, perpetually offended atheists at the Freedom From Religion Foundation are complaining more and more about it, even though “In God We Trust” is the official motto of the United States and is emblazoned on U.S. currency.

The latest agency to add the decals is the Childress, Texas, police department, The Associated Press reported.

In an interview with the Red River Sun, Police Chief Adrian Garcia said he made the decision in response to the recent wave of attacks on police officers, including Harris County Sheriff’s Deputy Darren Goforth, who was executed while putting gas in his cruiser.

“I think with all the assaults happening on officers across the country, and the two that happened in the past few days in Harris County and Abilene, it’s time we get back to where we once were,” he said. “This is our nation’s motto … it’s even on our currency. It’s nothing new.”

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Try explaining that to the Wisconsin-based Freedom From Religion Foundation, which continues to complain about the decals.

In an attempt to bully law enforcement, the atheist group sent letters to a number of agencies around the country, include Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Kentucky and Virginia, demanding they remove the decals, according to The AP.

The letters prompted one tough-talking Florida sheriff to boldly tell the atheist group where to go, sort of.

“If the Freedom From Religion Foundation wishes us to take them off our vehicles I suggest that they get a judge’s order or a new Sheriff,” wrote Walton County Sheriff Michael Adkinson.

When it comes to “In God We Trust,” the courts have been on the side of common sense — for a change.

The AP reported that the Texas-based Liberty Institute said the U.S. Supreme Court and lower courts have repeatedly allowed the phrase as “part of the country’s history and heritage.”

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