Feds ban accused terrorist from flying, but his state lets him drive a semi?

Amir Mashal 1Why would a man who is on the terrorist “no fly list” be given a commercial driver’s license and the potential to drive children in a school bus?

That’s the question many are asking after a news report by KMSP that Amir Meshal, a man identified as a “terror threat” by federal officials, was given his Class A driver’s license on Aug. 8.

What’s more is, the $4,000 tuition Meshal paid to learn to drive a commercial vehicle was paid by taxpayers via the state workforce program, KMSP reported.

Worse yet the department confirmed that Meshal, a U.S. citizen, has applied for a school bus endorsement.

Meshal was removed and barred from a Minnesota mosque, Al Farooq, after he was suspected of radicalizing Muslim youth.

“We have concerns about Meshal interacting with our youth,” The mosque’s leaders told authorities at the time according to the police report.

In 2007 Meshal was arrested by the FBI in Kenya on suspicion that he had just left a terror training camp in Somalia, according to KMSP.

The American Civil Liberties Union, which is suing the U.S. government on his behalf for detaining him for three months, has also petitioned to have Meshal removed from the no-fly list but have been rebuffed because the Department of Homeland Security still considers the man a credible threat.

In response to the ACLU request the department wrote that Meshal “may be a threat to civil aviation or national security,” and that, “It has been determined that you (Amir Meshal) are an individual who represents a threat of engaging in or conducting a violent act of terrorism and who is operationally capable of doing so.”

What a comforting thought the next time you put your kids on a school bus — if you live in a liberal state like Minnesota, anyway.

Meshal’s attorney, Hina Shamsi, responded to the KMSP report by declaring that his client has never been charged with a crime and is merely an unemployed American “trying to obtain credentials for a job so he can build a life for his family, including a baby.”

Yeah, and the 9/11 hijackers just wanted to be pilots.

Carmine Sabia

Carmine Sabia

Carmine Sabia Jr started his own professional wrestling business at age 18 and went on to become a real estate investor. Currently he is a pundit who covers political news and current events.
Carmine Sabia

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