Jeb snaps at reporter over ‘anchor babies’ in testy exchange, too bad Rubio didn’t follow suit

Jeb Bush snapped at a reporter Thursday for yelling in his ear from behind. He didn’t much like the question the guy asked, either.

After using the term “anchor babies” Wednesday at a New Hampshire town hall meeting, Bush, former governor of Florida, was hounded by reporters the next day, asking him whether he thought the term offensive.

At a campaign press conference, the classic “do you regret” question was thrown out by one reporter .

“No, I don’t. I don’t regret it,” Bush said in a frustrated tone.

After being pressed by the same reporter, he snapped, “No, do you have a better term? OK, you give me, you give me a better term and I’ll use it. I’m serious. Don’t yell at me behind my ear, though. Jeez.”

“Anchor babies” became a hot topic after the exchange.

If Donald Trump’s “tell it like it is” campaign for the presidency has done anything, it’s to throw his Republican competitors into disarray.

Those who try to emulate his blunt, straight talk get hammered by the left; those who try to be more politically correct risk being scolded by the right.

CNN tweeted:

Which was followed in short order by Democratic Party leader Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton:

“How about ‘babies’?” 

Too bad she can’t use that word to described the truly innocent: the unborn.

After seeing the hornets’ nest Bush stirred up by defending his use of the term “anchor babies,” fellow Floridian Sen. Marco Rubio decided to be a bit more circumspect.

During an interview with CNBC’s John Harwood that aired Thursday, Rubio declined to use the term “anchor babies” to describe children born in the United States to illegal immigrants. “Well, these are 13 million — those are human beings. And ultimately, they are people. They are not just statistics. They are human beings with stories,” Rubio told Harwood.

The Daily Mail’s White House correspondent, Francesca Chambers, took note and tweeted:

Trap? Since when is accurately describing someone a “trap”? Others wondered also and responded to Chambers:

Then there were these observations:

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