Christian clubs rejected as ‘discriminatory’ allowed back on campus, but only under conditions

Christian clubs that refuse to allow non-Christians to take leadership positions are now considered “discriminatory” by California State University administrators.

Groups like InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, Chinese Christian Fellowship, and Cru — formerly known as Campus Crusade for Christ — are just a few of the clubs affected, according to The College Fix.

 

In order to stay on campus, some have agreed in writing to let non-Christians run for elected leadership positions.

Earlier this year, students were given the option to change their bylaws or shut down.

Because they stood firm in their convictions, the Christian groups were scrubbed from campus websites and directories, could not recruit new members on campus or take part in campus events, were to be charged hundred of dollars to use facilities on campus, and lost the opportunity to apply for funding – perks that all recognized student groups have on campus.

This hurt membership for many Christian clubs across Cal State’s 23 campuses.

According to Greg Jao, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship’s national field director, the Chico State chapter alone lost 50 members due to the policy change.

For the past several months, national leadership from Cru has been talking with the CSU administrators to find a solution acceptable to both the system and religious organizations.

It seems as though that compromise is to passively go along to get along, but the groups don’t have much choice. A 2010 Supreme Court ruling enforces an “all-comers” policy of acceptance.

Jao told the Times that InterVarsity agreed to “some small technical fixes,” but the bylaws still maintain that “leaders are expected to lead the group in a manner consistent with InterVarsity’s mission and message.”

Toni Molle, CSU director of public affairs, told the Times, “nothing in our policy limits a student organization in their ability to engage in a robust and highly informed election process,” implying that although non-Christians could be elected, that won’t necessarily be the case.

Lauren Cooley

Lauren Cooley

Lauren Cooley is a conservative commentator, columnist, and consultant. She speaks nationwide about bias in higher education and political issues impacting young adults. Follow her on Twitter: @laurenacooley
Lauren Cooley

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