Opinion

Hillary outclassed again: How Condoleezza Rice could teach her a thing or two about charity

A 2014 speech by Hillary Clinton to the Boys and Girls Club of Long Beach shows the stark difference between the former secretary of state and the woman who preceded her, Condoleezza Rice.

When Rice gave a speech at the annual luncheon for the charity in 2009, she collected a $60,000 speaking fee, and donated almost all of that fee back to the club.

Hillary – naturally – was not as generous. She charged $200,000 and “donated” the entire fee to the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton foundation.

The cost to the Boys and Girls Club – which has an annual budget of less than $3 million – was blasted by some organizers of the event, according to Politico. A Boys and Girls Club organizer who helped plan Clinton’s 2014 appearance said the arrangement “felt more like a pay-to-play type thing.”

“With Hillary, it was more businesslike,” said the volunteer.

Between her speaking fee, and the fact that her entourage took up a large portion of the available seating, the charity was only able to raise a mere $106,000 at the lunchtime event – a 25-year low for the organization.

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Supporters of the Boys and Girls Club also told Politico that they were disappointed by Clinton’s decision not to socialize with any of the youth that the charity focuses on helping.

Rice’s 2009 appearance, by contrast, made a very different impression. Rice spent the morning before her speech touring the facility and talking with children in the club about the importance of staying in school.

Her modest speaking fee, and the fact that she donated it back to the organization, also helped the charity raise more than $250,000 during the luncheon.

To sum up: Rice leveraged her image to help the Boys and Girls Club raise money and make a difference in the lives of kids.

Clinton leveraged her image to raise money for herself – and the slush-fund foundation her family runs.

But there’s a kind of class money can’t buy.

Michael Schaus

Michael Schaus is a talk radio host, political humorist, and columnist. Having worked in a wide range of industries (including construction, journalism, and financial services) his perspectives and world views are forged with a deep understanding of what it means to be an American entrepreneur.
Michael Schaus

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