Opinion

Plan to force schoolchildren to try cross-dressing has Italian parents up in arms

A bizarre cross-dressing plan by educators in northern Italy to have boys dress like girls and girls dress like boys has moms and dads up in arms.

And they’re ready to march on Rome.

Under the guise of teaching children “respect,” schools in the city of Trieste are teaching children that men and women are interchangeable and can perform jobs that way – including firefighters and plumbers, according to Breitbart.

The program includes a game called “If He Were She and She Were He,” where children exchange their clothes and talk about how their new gender identity makes them feel, Breitbart reported.

Well, parents seem to know how that makes them feel – angry enough to plan a demonstration in the Italian capital of Rome.

According to Breitbart:

The spokesman for the protest, Prof. Massimo Gandolfin, said that Saturday’s demonstration was organized “to protect our children from the propaganda of gender theories that are appearing surreptitiously and in an ever more worrying way in schools.”

The event, he said, will defend the institution of marriage as composed of a man and a woman, the child’s right to have a mother figure and a father, without having to suffer as kindergarteners the propaganda of gender ideology that Pope Francis has defined as “an error of the human mind.”

(An “error of the human mind” seems like a charitable way to describe robbing boys and girls of their childhood to promote a political agenda.)

Distasteful as the Italian model sounds, it’s been tried before– and in the United States. In 2013, for instance, a school in Milwaukee’s “Gender Bender Day” outraged some parents but ended up causing even more embarrassment for the enlightened administrators of the Tippecanoe School of Arts and Humanities.

Not one student participated, so the cross dressing was left up to the teachers and staff, according to the Daily Caller.

Rome should be even more interesting than usual on Saturday.

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