Opinion

Hillary’s EPIC FAIL: Where were the adoring throngs for her campaign’s new launch?

Hillary Clinton’s “don’t-call-it-a-relaunch” presidential campaign launch wasn’t as well-attended as she would have liked– and nowhere near what a Democratic Party would expect if it wants to hold onto the White House next year.

Organizers were so optimistic that they designated an “overflow” area to handle progressive partisans who were sure to crowd New York’s Roosevelt Island to get a glimpse of the former secretary of state according to multiple media outlets.
Instead, a photo tweeted by CNN’s Dan Merica showed a dismally empty overflow area:

Fox News estimated that crowd had “less than 2,000” spectators, according to this video:

 

Even MSNBC admitted that the turnout was pretty weak. Here’s a snippet of its broadcast:

 

Even worse for the liberals, anemic Clinton numbers weren’t unique to New York. CNN reported that the turnout for an Iowa launch watch party organized by Clinton volunteers was decidedly underwhelming.

It’s a sad showing, especially when you compare the turnout to the crowd U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders’ announcement speech attracted. Even though mainstream media pundits would have you believe the Independent from Vermont has exactly zero chance of winning, he was able to turn out a crowd estimated at 5,000 when he announced his run for the presidency in Burlington, according to this tweet:

 

Sanders has actually been turning some heads for his ability to draw unexpectedly large crowds. The Washington Post reported that nearly 2,000 supporters packed a Minneapolis gym for in late May to hear the senator speak – about as many who showed up for Clinton on Roosevelt Island.

In his Minneapolis speech,

Sanders vowed that the rich would start paying their fair share of taxes if he’s elected president.

Could it be that the populist Clinton isn’t as popular as the mainstream media would like us believe?

Tracy Connors

Tracy has a diverse work history, from corporate collections, to car sales, to the wonderful world of film and television production, to political radio, commentary, and activism.

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