Public university to build exclusive study lounge to segregate gays – because they asked for it

In a bid to help gay and lesbian students feel more accepted, officials at the University of Oklahoma are planning to build a study lounge segregated by sexual preference.

The initiative for an exclusively “LGBTQ” study lounge, proposed by the gay-rights organization Queer Inclusion on Campus, will be constructed as a “safe space” for students who fear harassment from heterosexuals on campus, according to a report in the Oklahoma Daily.

“It’s going to be huge,” University senior Alexander Ruggiers told the campus newspaper. “I think it’s going to be used for a number of things. One, to have a sense of community, something that LGBTQ students have never had before.”

Initially, the group had also been pushing for a resource center exclusively for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender students.

“We produced a document that we delivered to a lot of high-level administrators about things that we wanted to see changed,” Ruggiers said.

The study lounge – which is funded by tuition dollars and taxpayer funds – was a compromise, giving gay and lesbian students a place to “be themselves.”

A funny thing happened on ‘White Appreciation Day’ . . .

The concept of segregated “safe spaces” has been trending in liberal academia. Last year, staffers in the Diversity and Equity Center at South Puget Sound Community College endorsed the idea by holding a black-only event to discuss racism.

A private elementary school in New York also adopted the concept by segregating third-grade students once a week in an effort to cut back on “micro-aggressions.”

The University of Oklahoma’s decision to build a segregated student lounge exclusively for LGBTQ students is the latest example of special interest-groups hoping “separate but equal” will somehow lead to greater diversity and acceptance.

A study lounge exclusively for heterosexual students is not being considered.

Michael Schaus

Michael Schaus is a talk radio host, political humorist, and columnist. Having worked in a wide range of industries (including construction, journalism, and financial services) his perspectives and world views are forged with a deep understanding of what it means to be an American entrepreneur.
Michael Schaus

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