Cop on McKinney pool video in hiding over DEATH THREATS; apologizes for ‘reacting to a situation’

While confirming reports that her client resigned, the attorney for McKinney police Cpl. Eric Casebolt said the now-former cop has been forced into hiding after receiving death threats.

At a news conference Wednesday, attorney Jane Bishkin said Casebolt, who was captured on video responding to an out-of-control pool party, resigned to help soothe tensions in the community.

“It is his hope that his resignation will facilitate the cooperative relationship between the citizens and the police officers of the city of McKinney,” Bishkin said.

Bishkin declined to say where Casebolt is now, but said he allowed his emotions to get the better of him while trying to gather information from unruly teenagers on what happened at the pool party.

She explained that Casebolt, a 10-year veteran who was once named the department’s “Officer of the Year,” had responded to two suicide calls earlier in the day, including a black male who had shot himself in the head.

She said those calls had taken an emotional toll on the officer, and that he apologized for his actions.

Teen at pool party: We didn’t have to listen to cops because ‘they called us names’

“Eric regrets that his conduct portrayed him and his department in a negative light,” she said. “He never intended to mistreat anyone, but was only reacting to a situation and the challenges that it presented. He apologizes to all who were offended.”

Meanwhile, the International Business Times reported that Casebolt was previously accused of violating the civil rights of a black motorist convicted of drug crimes — the claim coming the same year the officer was recognized for exceptional service.

Albert Earl Brown Jr. sued Casebolt and two other McKinney police officers for alleged racial profiling, excessive force and falsifying information after he was arrested in 2007 for possession of a controlled substance.

The lawsuit was later dismissed because Brown, who said he was set up, didn’t trust his court-appointed attorney and was unable to represent himself because he was incarcerated.

Tom Tillison

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