Clinton is caught ‘misstating’ family history — again; and MSM reporters whitewash it

Presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton got caught in another fabrication about her family history Wednesday when she claimed all four of her grandparents were immigrants.

And as usual, the mainstream media is putting as nice a spine as possible on it. (Is “lied” too strong a word?)

Only one of the former first lady’s grandparents — Hugh Rodham Sr., her paternal grandfather — had immigrated to the United States. The other three were born here, according to BuzzFeed News.

“All my grandparents, you know, came over here and you know my grandfather went to work in lace mill in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and worked there until he retired at 65. He started there when he was a teenager and just kept going,” Clinton said, according to Buzzfeed.

She made the reference to her family’s history when decrying the lack of a comprehensive immigration bill while speaking at Capital City Fruit in Norwalk, Iowa.

She made a similar reference last year when speaking of her paternal grandmother, Hanna Jones Rodham, when addressing an audience in Louisville, Ky.

“She immigrated with her family as a young girl to Scranton and went to work — very young―in a silk mill, and then she met and married my grandfather, who had also come to this country as a young man from the coal mining area in Newcastle, in England.”

Public records indicate Hanna Jones Rodham was actually born in Pennsylvania.

Public records also disclose that both of Clinton’s maternal grandparents, Della Howell and Edwin Howell, were both born in Illinois.

BuzzFeed News asked the Clinton campaign about the discrepancy.

“Her grandparents always spoke about the immigrant experience and, as a result she has always thought of them as immigrants,” a Clinton spokesman said, according to BuzzFeed. “As has been correctly pointed out, while her grandfather was an immigrant, it appears that Hillary’s grandmother was born shortly after her parents and siblings arrived in the U.S. in the early 1880s.”

New York Times presidential campaign correspondent Maggie Haberman appeared taken aback by the latest Clinton fabrication, and tweeted:

It didn’t take long for word to spread on the Twitterverse, with some wondering about Haberman’s charitable use of the word “misstated.”

Other Clinton “misstatements” were brought up — such as when she claimed during her first presidential run that her plane had landed in Bosnia under sniper fire when she was first lady.

And her claim that she was named after Sir Edmund Hillary — even though she was born years before he achieved fame by conquering Mount Everest.

And then there’s the old double standard when the mainstream media reports on Democrats versus Republicans:

We can pardon a person who “misspeaks” occasionally — after all, none of us is perfect and time has a way of distorting memory. But such lapses turn into lies when they become a matter of course.

And when they come from the mainstream media, it’s just business as usual.

Be sure to also check out:
Outrage! Judge hammers white victims of armed home invasion for racism, lets criminal go free

Wasserman Schultz draws smallest crowd ever; makes embarrassingly childish remark about Marco Rubio

Comments

Latest Articles