‘I was wrong,’ gun groups ‘schooled me’: Retired cop flips on favoring gun restrictions

A retired Maryland police officer recanted his former position on gun restriction and gave powerful testimony to the Maryland Senate in support of concealed carry reform.

Jack McCauley told senators, that he didn’t always feel the way he does today about private gun ownership.

“These crazy people, these Second Amendment activists, they’re all going to want these, they’re trophies,” McCauley said, describing his previous beliefs during last week’s testimony.

“They’re all going to want these permits, it’s going to be scary. Dangerous people are going to be getting guns. Just any Joe citizen is going to get a gun.”

McCauley, a former commander of the Maryland State Police Licensing Division, once held the power for who would get to carry a gun in his state.

Maryland is a “may-issue” state, which essentially means the commander may or may not issue a license to carry a handgun based on an individual basis. That basis needs to be considered “good and substantial” by a government official.

McCauley told the senators he was fearful of issuing the licenses,  having bought into the left’s hysteria that law-abiding gun owners who wish to carry are irresponsible, vigilante fanatics.

Anxious about less restrictive gun laws due to a Maryland court ruling while he was commander, McCauley did something few gun-grabbers take the time to: He researched the subject, including interviewing gun rights advocates — and came to a very different conclusion.

“When I met them, they schooled me,” he testified. “They not only schooled me – they embarrassed me. They humbled me. I was wrong. I was completely wrong.”

Through his research McCauley exposed what he called “staggering information about handgun permits” and called his previous fears “unjustified.” He cited a 10-year extensive study that found only 168 gun owners had their permits revoked out of 2.5 million permit-holders.

He added that the majority of those revoked were for accidental, nonviolent offenses.

McCauley admitted that at first, he tried to disprove his own findings, but the more he dug for information the more he kept drawing the same conclusion – gun ownership does not lead to more violence.

Today, McCauley is an outspoken gun rights supporter and described the “good and substantial” — guidelines — the ones he used to enforce — as a messy, bureaucratic disaster.

He testified before the Senate to support the use of concealed carry for the purposes of self-defense.

H/T: The Blaze

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