The 75 Republicans who voted to fund Obama’s amnesty: Remember these names

House Republicans, led by Speaker John Boehner, caved in to Democrat demands and passed a “clean” funding bill for the Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday.

The bill includes funding for Obama’s executive amnesty actions, a sticking point for conservatives.

The legislation provides funding for Obama’s move to shield about 5 million illegals from deportation.

Boehner and the Republicans who passed the bill picked the same day as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s address before Congress — perhaps using it as cover to push the bill through with less major media attention.

The New York Daily News reported that Boehner addressed Republicans and told them that the immigration issue in the hands of the courts and Congress should “move on with other business.”

The News, however, summed up the conservative argument succinctly.

Many conservatives have long argued that allowing Obama’s amnesty order to be funded means the president’s program will continue, despite what the courts may rule, as the administration has previously shown its willingness to defy or bypass court orders.

And once amnesty is in place, critics contend, non-citizens falling under its protections could well be put on a path to the voting booth that would give their Democrat enablers a virtual lock on national political power.

Can there be a quicker way to “fundamentally transform America” than to create a virtual one-party system by flooding the country with new, Democrat, voters?

The 74 Republicans who joined Boehner to vote with the Dems were:

1. Benishek
2. Bishop (Mich.)
3. Boehner
4. Bost
5. Brooks (Ind.)
6. Buchanan
7. Calvert
8. Carter (Texas)
9. Coffman
10. Cole
11. Collins (N.Y.)
12. Comstock
13. Costello (Pa.)
14. Curbelo (Fla.)
15. Davis, Rodney
16. Denham
17. Dent
18. Diaz-Balart
19. Dold
20. Ellmers (N.C.)
21. Emmer (Minn.)
22. Fitzpatrick
23. Frelinghuysen
24. Gibson
25. Granger
26. Guinta
27. Hanna
28. Hardy
29. Heck (Nev.)
30. Hurd (Texas)
31. Jolly
32. Katko
33. King (N.Y.)
34. Kinzinger (Ill.)
35. Kline
36. Knight
37. Lance
38. LoBiondo
39. MacArthur
40. McCarthy
41. McCaul
42. McHenry
43. McMorris Rogers
44. McSally
45. Meehan
46. Miller (Mich.)
47. Moolenaar
48. Murphy (Pa.)
49. Noem
50. Nunes
51. Paulsen
52. Pittenger
53. Pitts
54. Poliquin
55. Reichert
56. Rogers (Ky.)
57. Ros-Lehtinen
58. Royce
59. Ryan (Wis.)
60. Scalise
61. Schock
62. Shimkus
63. Simpson
64. Smith (N.J.)
65. Stefanik
66. Stivers
67. Thompson (Pa.)
68. Tiberi
69. Trott
70. Turner
71. Upton
72. Valadao
73. Walden
74. Walters, Mimi
75. Young (Ind.)

Many Twitter conservatives blasted the move — expressing isgust with Boehner and Co.

Firebrand Michelle Malkin led the charge.

Carmine Sabia

Carmine Sabia Jr started his own professional wrestling business at age 18 and went on to become a real estate investor. Currently he is a pundit who covers political news and current events.
Carmine Sabia

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