Outraged mom says prying school surveys snoop into families’ private lives

Public schools continue to invade private lives – and a personal survey given to Indiana middle and high school kids is a glaring example of the growing government overreach.

Schools have surveyed teens for years about their drug and alcohol use, but some parents say probing personal, questions about family relationships – “do you enjoy spending time with your mother” – go too far.

“They crossed the line when they entered the home,” said Michelle Bracewell.

Bracewell told Fox 59 in Indianapolis that she understood the survey questions given to her seventh-grade daughter about drug and alcohol use. But she was aghast at those that followed.

The survey states at the beginning that it is voluntary. But kids are often inclined to feel pressure to do what others are doing, and likely will fill out the forms to appease their peers and teachers.

This is just part of the extensive survey for sixth graders:

sixth grade survey 1

“My neighbors notice when I am doing a good job and let me know about it?”

What the heck does that mean? A good job at what?

“We ask these questions for purposes of public health,” said Ruth Gassman, Executive Director of the Indiana Prevention Resource Center.

“These items are referred to ask risk and protective factors for alcohol, tobacco and drug use,” said Gassman.

But the surveys go way beyond that.

Not only does the creepy questionnaire encourage students to tattle on parents and insinuate things about neighbors, but it also asks about friends and their behaviors.

The second survey meant for seventh through twelfth grade, gets more extensive on drug and alcohol use, and probed about a vast array of illegal substances.

Then, it too, delves into the psyche and behavior of home life.

survey 7th grade

Gassman claims that although kids are asked for their initials and birthdates, the information is not “stored” through the iPad used to take the survey – only “tracked” to gauge responses through the years, according to Fox 59.

It seems Indiana parents have good reason to be concerned.

“It’d be very easy to go back and look at a birthdate and initials and see who the child was,” said Bracewell.

“Those are personal questions, and if I want people to know what’s going on inside my home, I’ll let them know,” she said.

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