Campus ‘Sex Week’ under fire; ‘Free male sterilization’ used to promote event

Even with college tuition constantly rising and families worrying about how they’ll pay for higher education – a certain sect of university elites have been busy helping to coordinate “sex weeks” on campus.

But some conservative student groups are fighting back.

The annual events are becoming a growing trend and supposedly serve to educate students, and sometimes the general public, on a host of sexual topics that range from lewdness to lunacy.

Nothing is held back, as can be seen in the University of Chicago’s 2014 schedule of workshops that included, bondage, rope-tying, and oral sex.

Lest anyone think this kind of thing only happens within the corrupted confines of a city like Chicago, it should be known that the “sex week” rage is spreading.

sexweek flyer

The University of Utah, for instance, is touting a chance for students to win one year’s worth of “free birth control” that includes everything from contraceptive pills to a vasectomy, according to a 2015 Sex Week flyer taken from the Students for Choice Facebook page.

“The more events you attend, the more chances you’ll have to win a year’s supply of birth control…” the ad emphasized.

The U of U pro-life group Right to Life is protesting the event, and took particular issue with its promotion of a movie, “The Obvious Child,” that champions a young woman’s decision to have an abortion.

Right to Life says the event sends a dangerous message and requested that it be canceled or at least relocated off campus to the headquarters of Sex Week’s partner, Planned Parenthood.

Right to Life was denied the request according to Fox 13, but was given a spot to put up its own display during the event.

The group’s co-president told Fox 13 events such as the university’s Sex Week ignore the real-life consequences – and decisions – students will face.

“Twenty-five percent of people are going to conceive a child when they have sex, and you have to understand those risks and be prepared in case it happens,” Lauren Keeling told the station.

“You don’t have to end the life of your child,” she said.

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