Uproar at the opera: Muslim woman kicked out in France; ‘The Met’ shows pro-terrorist play

In what can only be described as a disgusting display of insensitivity, The Metropolitan Opera has decided to showcase a pro-terrorist play in the heart of New York City starting tonight.

The Death of Klinghoffer” is based on the murder of disabled Jewish American businessman Leon Klinghoffer, who was killed by the Palestine Liberation Front terrorists during the 1985 hijacking of the Achille Lauro cruise ship.

The work has struck a nerve deep within the souls of patriotic Americans — even for those who’ve never been near an opera — and particularly the Jewish community.

“For starters, the title is so misleading. It wasn’t that Leon Klinghoffer just died. He was a handicapped man in a wheelchair. He was executed by PLO terrorists who had hijacked the Achille Lauro, an Italian cruise ship in 1985,” Helen Freedman, executive director of Americans for a Safe Israel told Newsmax TV.

“The librettist, Alice Goodman, has chosen to present the story in such a way that we don’t sympathize with the victim. We are expected to sympathize with the terrorists They call themselves freedom fighters.” she said.

America is referred to as “one big fat Jew” in the play, reported Newsmax.

The Met sees it from another angle.

“It’s not anti-Semitic. It does not glorify terrorism in any way.” Met General Manager Peter Gelb told BBC, “It is a brilliant work of art that must be performed.”

Gelb further describes the opera as “very powerful and moving”, according to BBC.

Despite those words, former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani will be leading protests against the play and Klinghoffer’s daughters have written a letter that will appear in the opera playbill.

France, meanwhile, has taken a much tougher stance on radical Islam.
Last week, a Muslim women was removed from the Opera Bastille for wearing a full face-covering veil, reported Breitbart.
The woman, who was with a male companion and a showing of “La Traviata,” was spotted by theater officials who informed her of a law passed in 2011 that prohibits the wearing of any clothing that covers the face.

“Some performers said they did not want to sing” said Jean-Philippe Thiellay, Bastille’s deputy director, to Le Monde. “It’s never nice to ask someone to leave… But there was a misunderstanding of the law and the lady either had to respect it or leave,” he said.

The law, which was upheld by the European Court of Human Rights in 2014, includes exceptions for women wearing a niqab if she is traveling in a private car or worshiping in a religious place.

These two incidents illustrate starkly different responses to the dangers of radical Islam.

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Carmine Sabia

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