Florida Five: Jeb Bush says few kids apprehended at border were returned, Nonwhites become majority

Five of today’s top Florida political stories at your fingertips:

jeb bushJeb Bush says few children apprehended at border in 2014 were returned: Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, one of the Republican Celebration’s most vocal advocates of federal action on immigration policy, lately re-entered the immigration debate with an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal concerning the thousands of undocumented Central American minors flocking across the United States border. Bush, a prospective 2016 candidate, co-authored the op-ed with Clint Bolick, the vice president for litigation at the libertarian Goldwater Institute (the two also teamed up for a book on immigration in 2013). Ahead of laying out their suggested course of action, Bush and Bolick clarify the dilemma: Read more.

Tallahassee no longer fits as Florida’s capital: It made sense to put Florida’s capital in Tallahassee back when it was the center the state’s plantation economy.But for nearly 100 years it’s been hard to argue that Tallahassee — at least a four-hour drive from Tampa and about eight from Miami — remains a logical spot for Florida’s seat of government. Read more.

Nonwhites likely to define Central Florida’s future: Look into the face of Central Florida’s future. His hair is as black and shiny as a polished shoe. He has chocolate-brown eyes. He is 2 days old, his name is Jayson Mendez, and he’s the second child of his Hispanic mother.He joins a generation that will become the most racially diverse in American history. Slightly more than half the babies born in the United States are black, Hispanic and Asian, according to the latest census figures. Before the end of the decade, the Census Bureau predicts, the majority of children in the U.S. will be nonwhite.”It’s a snapshot of America in the future,” said Bill Frey, a demographer with The Brookings Institution in Washington.In Orange and Osceola counties, it is already happening. Hispanic children younger than 5 in Osceola outnumbered white children by 3,000 in 2010. Read more.

With dozens of King Ranch-Style fundraisers, why pick on just one? I have a question or two for the Tampa Bay Times, which last week devoted a substantial chunk of its precious front page -– and more than a few reporter man-hours -– to “uncover” a story that is one of literally dozens, perhaps even hundreds of in-kind political fundraisers sponsored by Florida companies at glitzy or pricey destinations. Why does the Times overdose like a back-alley crackhead on this particular one? Count ’em — you’ll find 79 paragraphs in Michael Van Sickler and Craig Pittman’s main story alone.I Beg to Differ.As Heartland Institute fellow James Taylor, Florida face of mediatrackers.org, put it in his take on the Times’ mountainous coverage, “… The article may be single-handedly responsible for rampant deforestation throughout the state.” Read more.

Fruit imports moving smoothly through South Florida ports: A U.S. Department of Agriculture pilot program begun last September to allow ports in South Florida to handle blueberries and grapes from Peru and Uraguay might have had minimal impact on the Port of Miami and Port Everglades, but officials at both call the program a winning prelude to port expansion.”The South Florida ports were allowed to accept these foreign shipments as long as the fruit has been chilled for at least 17 days prior to entry,” said USDA port foreman Roderick Hunter. “That protects against the transmission of fruit flies.”The program will continue in Miami and Port Everglades during the coming season, Hunter said. Read more.

BONUS:  Where’s Bill Nelson’s place in politics now?

For more Florida political news, visit BPR’s FLORIDA NEWS page

 

Comments

Latest Articles