A camel on campus is too racist; PC extremists force cancellation of ‘Hump Day’

Camels on campus are as banned as burritos.

The University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minn., has canceled a plan to bring a camel ton campus to avoid upsetting some students’ delicate sensibilities, according to the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

humpday0517
Photo: Campus Reform

The dromedary dispute rose up earlier this week over the Residence Hall Association’s plan to bring the trained camel to campus on Wednesday to celebrate “Hump Day,” the midway point of the week before final exams, the newspaper reported.

The idea was to give students a chance to see an animal most Americans will never experience in person, possibly get a chance to pet it, and maybe have a picture taken. Just the kind of light-hearted, innocent fun we’d all like the nation’s next generation of leaders to experience, right?

Wrong, according to a Facebook protest, since taken down.

According to Campus Reform, the Facebook page “Protest Hump DAAAAAAY” blasted the plan as racist and insensitive to Middle Eastern cultures (you can bet they didn’t mean Israel), bad for animal rights (the camel wasn’t being eaten), and bad for global warming. (Someone apparently thought the locally owned camel was getting shipped halfway across the world for the event.)

Enraged Dallas morning show co-host
receiving death threats after ESPN kiss debate

In other words, a veritable trifecta of liberal grievance was unleashed on one afternoon of end-of-school relaxation.

The affair was similar to a campus incident in early May, when Dartmouth students canceled a fundraiser for cardiac care themed to Cinco de Mayo because some hypersensitive souls apparently found Tex-Mex cuisine redolent of New England’s rampant racism.

That event was for charity. The St. Thomas plan was just “to have a little fun, bring students together,” according to RHA adviser Aaron Macke.

Politically correct scolds don’t do fun – and neither does anyone else when they’re around. Hence, Hump Day was canceled.

“If this is going to be something that’s divisive, then it’s not worth doing,” Macke said.

No normal person could disagree with this voice of the nation’s next generation of leaders.

And that’s exactly the problem.

Joe Saunders

Joe Saunders, a 25-year newspaper veteran, is a staff writer and editor for BizPac Review who lives in Tallahassee and covers capital and Florida politics. Email Joe at [email protected].

Comments

Latest Articles