United Nations an anti-American hotbed of scandals and defeats

united nations building

The United Nations is a strange place.

It’s a group that demonstrates the absurdity of using an endless process of toothless diplomatic negotiations to arrive at peace at any price. To people who are truly able to assess its strengths and weaknesses, the U.N. is both laughable and useless. Except for one feature: It can give legitimacy to rogue states. There is value to the dictatorships, totalitarian regimes and criminal nations of the world in seeking authenticity by claiming to be involved in the United Nation’s efforts and leadership.

Even worse, the U.N. has become dangerous. It has failed to disarm terrorist states like Iran, Iraq and the Sudan, and it has failed to halt nuclear proliferation in outlaw nations like North Korea, China and Iran. If the U.N. did not pose a danger to the future of America, we could just be amused by its failures and move on. But what’s amazing is how the U.N. has continued to exist as the defeats accumulate.

This is no small matter. This body is supposed to enforce world order, but it aids and abets mass murderers and genocide. It places some of the most despicable governments you can think of — Libya, Cuba, Sudan, China, Venezuela, Zimbabwe — on its Human Rights Council, which is supposed to uphold the highest standards in human rights protection. Yet the council is controlled by African and Middle Eastern countries, which vote in blocs and protect one another from criticism over their own human rights violations. Their union ends up creating a massive credibility deficit for the U.N. Even worse, the council is a habitual “get Israel” body. Within a year after it was created, the council passed nine condemnations of Israel, the only country so sanctioned, because of its so-called “violations” in Palestinian territories. The U.N. and human rights make for an oxymoronic partnership, one that defies credibility.

The elite liberal bastions and radical left of America — dominated by Hollywood, academia, the mainstream media and the entertainment industry — clamor to give the U.N. a reputation for competence and integrity. They see the U.N. as effective, “the great hope for humanity.” However, in light of the U.N.’s history of bribes, dangerous dereliction, corruption and financial scandals, its reputation among people who believe in U.S. exceptionalism has plummeted to the bottom of the international barrel.

Not convinced? The world’s self-professed guardians of global order failed in 2011 to save the rebels of Libya from being annihilated by the mad, murderous dictator, Muammar Gaddafi – who, ironically enough – was a member of the Human Rights Council.

In 2007, the U.N. made Iran vice chairman of the Disarmament Commission.

In the same year, Freedom House ranked more than half the 47 members of the Human Rights Council as “unfree” or “partly free.”

In 2008, the U.N. elected as its president Miguel d’Escoto, who won the 1985 Lenin Prize and had served as foreign minister of the communist dictatorship in Nicaragua. Quite a sick joke.

In 2007, the global economic “powerhouse” of Zimbabwe was chosen to head the U.N.’s economic development commission.

Last year, the U.N. wanted the United States to sign its Arms Trade Treaty, which would have surrendered America’s Second Amendment rights, blocked U.S. authority to enter arms trading agreements with its allies, and required the nation to “support weapons collection” and “disarmament” of ex-combatants.

Gallup reported in February that well over half of Americans think the U.N. is doing a “poor job” and a third thought it was doing a “good job.” So why does the United States continue to fund more than a quarter of U.N. costs, 75 percent of which goes to administrative, bureaucratic overhead? America is the U.N.’s largest contributor. Congress should use U.S. tax money to pay the U.N. only for programs that are in America’s best interest, and then insist it gets what it pays for.

What will it take for President Obama and Congress to figure out that the U.N. is an ineffective abomination that most Americans condemn?

John R. Smith

John R. Smith is chairman of BIZPAC, the Business Political Action Committee of Palm Beach County, and owner of a financial services company. He is a frequent columnist for BizPac Review.
John R. Smith

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