Obamacare’s war on religion, the Constitution goes to Supreme Court this week

Religious freedom is going to court on Tuesday when the Supreme Court hears an Obamacare case one law professor calls “the heart of the culture war.”

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Photo: Huffington Post

The combined case being argued involved Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Woods Specialties Corp. and the Obamacare mandate that companies pay for birth control methods that include abortion.

The two companies are privately owned by families whose religious faiths forbid abortions and who have challenged the government’s right to force them to violate their beliefs.

Obamacare forces American employers to provide health insurance that covers 20 birth control methods, including Plan B or the “morning after” pill, which kills a fertilized egg by preventing it from being implanted in the uterus. To the religious owners of Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Woods, that’s abortion.

The companies have no complaint with the other methods the law requires – IUDs and the like. The left’s baseless argument that this is some kind of conservative tactic to keep women from getting any birth control at all – part of the notorious “war on women” smear – doesn’t apply.

The case is really about the government’s ability to force Americans to abandon their religious beliefs on command.

“There’s a lot of stake here,” Yeshiva University law professor Marci A. Hamilton told The Hill. “This is the heart of the culture war.”

It’s actually the heart of the Obama administration’s war on the Constitution.

Sarah Torre, a policy analyst with the Heritage Foundation, makes the point.

“The Obama administration has made one thing very clear: that your faith is a private affair. You can follow your beliefs, exercise your faith in your home your house of worship, but step outside those four walls to build a business, to run a charity, and your religious freedom ends,” she said in a video posted by Heritage’s news team, The Foundry, over the weekend.

“We know that that’s not in line with the Constitution or federal laws protecting religious freedom. Every American, whether or not they’re at home or out in the workplace, should be able to live according to their deeply held convictions.”

Check out the video, as Torre answers key questions about the case.

 

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