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University textbook paints Reagan as sexist, conservatives as ‘self-centered, lazy’

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Who are they talking about again?

A textbook for up-and-coming social workers at the University of South Carolina describes President Ronald Reagan as a sexist with no time for women in power and conservatives in general as taking a “pessimistic view of human nature,” the Daily Caller reports.

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Photo: Bayshore Tea Party

Citing a report from Campus Reform, a news outlet dedicated to exposing liberal bias in American higher education, the DC describes “Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare” as containing the classic liberal stereotypes of what conservatives like Reagan really stand for.

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As usual, they’re almost completely wrong.

For instance, according to the Daily Caller, “Introduction to Social Work” says Reagan “ascribed to women primarily ‘domestic functions’ and failed to appoint many women to significant positions of power during his presidency.”

He did? The president who named Sandra Day O’Connor to the Supreme Court, who made Jeane Kirkpatrick the first woman to be the American ambassador to the United Nations, and  named Elizabeth Dole the first woman transportation secretary wouldn’t appoint women to positions of power?

The man who stood shoulder to shoulder with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher to defeat the Soviet Union in the climactic decade of the Cold War thought women belonged in the kitchen?

The textbook, which includes a section called “Conservative Extremes in the 1980s and Early 1990s,” also describes conservatives as conceiving of human beings as essentially “self-centered, lazy and incapable of true charity.”

Conservatives believe people are self-centered and lazy?

In the Age of Obama — when the liberal idea of human happiness seems to be jobless young men and women lolling about on their parents’ health insurance until they’re 26, when a president builds a campaign around a fictional woman named Julia who depends on the government from cradle to grave for everything from her education to raising her fatherless child — the hypocrisy is astonishing.

Fortunately, not all young people, not even all young people at the University of South Carolina, are fooled.

“I can not even tell you how angry I was when I read that” textbook, sophomore Anna Chapman told Campus Reform. “This is really outrageous, it’s so in your face and people need to know about it.”

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