Florida Five: Will Weatherford tours lagoon, Bondi files brief, Creepy Uncle Sam parties

Start the shortened workweek off with Tuesday’s Florida Five – our picks of the top political news from around the state. And in case you missed it, the beleaguered Bucs beat the beleaguered Dolphins Monday night, winning their first game of the season.

umgenopp1112College kids chug for a conservative cause: Generation Opportunity – the conservative group behind those hilarious Creepy Uncle Sam ads — rolled into the parking lot of Sun Life Stadium for Saturday’s University of Miami-Virginia Tech game to try to talk some young Floridians out of being taken in by liberals’ Obamacare con game…Read more.

Bondi files brief over medical marijuana: General Pam Bondi is pushing back against a proposed ballot measure to legalize medical marijuana in the Sunshine State.

In a brief filed Friday in the Florida Supreme Court, Bondi argued that the ballot title and initiative are overall misleading to voters and hide the amendment’s “true scope and effect.”…Read more.

Rubio wants investigation into journo’s detention: Condemning the Venezuelan government for detaining Miami Herald reporter Jim Wyss, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., called on the Organization of American States to investigate the incident as part of Venezuela’s continued press freedom violations…Read more.

House Speaker tours Indian River Lagoon: Florida House Speaker Will Weatherford visited South Florida Monday to tour the Indian River Lagoon, the site of one of the two coastal estuaries battered by heavy summer rains. Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, chairman of the Senate Select Committee on the Indian River Lagoon and Lake Okeechobee Basin, played tour guide to the Wesley Chapel Republican in order to push for funding for projects outlined in the committee’s report…Read more.

vanity tags miami herald
Via Miami Herald

Specialty tag program needs boost: The state might have reached a tipping point on the number of specialty license plates, as there has been a noticeable decline in motorists willing to pay the extra fees to let others know their college or sports preferences or that they support the troops, manatees or even trees. But advocates of Florida’s specialty license plates say reducing auto registration fees toward pre-2009 levels could reinvigorate the program, which helps raise money for a wide range of causes…Read more.

For more Florida news, visit BPR’s FLORIDA NEWS page.

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