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Rand Paul calls for Obama, NSA to come clean about spying on Vatican

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Despite the National Security Agency’s denials that it spied on the pope, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., is asking President Obama to come clean with the public.

Paul introduced a Senate resolution on Thursday that says, according to Breitbart:

Whereas public news reports this week indicate that the United States National Security Agency monitored millions of phone calls in Italy in late 2012 and early 2013. Whereas these reports indicate that the National Security Agency monitored telephone calls made to and from a residence in Rome where then Archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio stayed during the conclave selecting Bergoglio, now known as His Holiness Pope Francis, to succeed Pope Benedict XVI;

Whereas this story has been widely reported in the American and international media. Whereas the National Security Agency has reportedly denied the allegations. Whereas these allegations are serious and President Obama should personally address these reports.

“This is so over the top, and it has to stop,” Paul told Fox News. “Do we want to be the country that is spying on the pope?”

Panorama, an Italian news magazine, reported earlier in the week that the NSA had targeted the Vatican, monitoring phone calls before and after the conclave to select the new pope.

“If we’re targeting religious leaders around the world and collecting their data, that’s a real problem,” Paul told The Daily Caller. “And really, right now, it’s giving us a black eye around the world that it turns out we spy on people’s personal phones around the world, including the chancellor of Germany.”

The NSA has denied the allegations.

“The National Security Agency does not target the Vatican,” NSA spokeswoman Vanee’ Vines said in an email to the Los Angeles Times. “Assertions that NSA has targeted the Vatican, published in Italy’s Panorama magazine, are not true.”

Watch Paul speak out on the issue on Fox News:


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