Senators for Syria strike took significant money from defense contractors

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Photo Credit – DailyCaller.com

With wide-spread opposition to a U.S. military strike in Syria that crosses both sides of the political aisle, there are some suggestions that the military-industrial complex is behind all the sabre rattling.

U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson is among those who believe as much.

“I did notice, for what it’s worth, that the manufacturer of the missiles that would be used has had an incredible run in their stock value in the last 60 days,” the Florida Democrat said on “The Agenda with Ari Rabin-Havt” Thursday morning.

“Nobody wants this except the military-industrial complex,” he added.

But is that just more rumblings from conspiracy theorists or is there something to this?

According to an analysis from Maplight.org, the ten Senate Foreign Relations Committee members who voted this week to attack Syria received 83 percent more campaign contributions from defense contractors than the senators who voted against it, as reported by Daily Caller.

Data from 2007 to 2012 shows that the average senator who voted “yes” on Wednesday received $72,850 from defense contractors and other defense industry interests, while the seven senators who voted “no” to an attack took just $39,770 on average.

No surprise that Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., led the pack, taking in about $176,000 from defense interests over five years. And the defense industry believes in hedging their bets, as Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., was second with $127,000.

In the end, as Daily Caller noted, next year’s projected $52 billion in sequester-mandated cuts to the Pentagon has defense contractors spooked. Considering as much, few things are better for the bottom line than “a limited, tailored strike, of short duration,” as U.S. Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., characterized a possible attack.

Read more at Daily Caller.

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Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
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The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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