Opinion

A new low for Jesse Jackson

Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton
Photo credit: Addictinginfo.org

Well, they’ve sent in the clowns. Radical black activist Jesse Jackson has hustled down to Florida, toting his fundraising arm, the Rainbow PUSH Coalition. “The Rev” came all the way down to tell us that “Florida is an apartheid state” and “the Selma of our time” — and to help his accomplice in blackmail, Al Sharpton, with Big Al’s campaign to boycott the state. Florida Gov. Rick Scott has denounced Jackson’s remarks, saying the so-called civil rights leader owes all Floridians an apology and demanding he stop insulting Florida citizens and racially inflaming the state.

There’s some rich ground to plow here. Jackson’s comments might be a new low even for someone who has made a career of low points (remember his arrest for criminal trespass, and referring to New York City as “Hymietown”?) and who has made a living as a professional race profiteer. The “Selma calls” are part of Jackson’s recipe to put money into his own pocket and to fund his divisive agenda. A fun exercise is to go back and count the number of places in the United States that Jackson over the years has compared to Selma, the Alabama city where voting rights marchers were attacked. There are at least eight places, including Yale University, that have prompted Jackson’s predictable knee-jerk moments of lucrative outrage.

Florida has an enviable history of getting past race issues. We don’t need interloper race hustlers like Jackson and Sharpton popping up here like a bad penny, meddling, preaching hate and accusing adversaries and the whole state of being racist bigots.

Fortunately, a growing number of Americans are learning that Jackson is a man who makes money off the loss of others. Even the mainstream media are finally letting people know that Jackson gets enormous paychecks by inciting racial strife. One can only wonder how Jackson amassed a net worth of $10 million (according to Celebrity NetWorth) from being a civil rights activist. The likely conclusion, since Jackson detests capitalism except for the money he can wring out of businesses, is that he made millions from his destructive race-baiting and running his own people into the ground.

Booker T. Washington was a black educator and prescient political leader who got it right when he predicted the coming of shakedown artists like Jackson and Sharpton, well before they arrived on the scene.

“There is another class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public,” Washington said early in the 20th century. “Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising [the] wrongs – partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs.”

Boom. Booker T. nailed it about Jackson and Sharpton.

Whenever Jackson opens his mouth publicly, it’s another coded statement for “it’s time for Jesse to get some money.” Jesse and Al both belong in a museum of relics and artifacts, poster boys for what happens when a worthy political movement gets bent and contorted into a quest for personal wealth, ill-gotten political power and fame.

Read also:

Jesse Jackson: Boycott Florida as an ‘apartheid state’

Fla. governor demands Jesse Jackson apologize for divisive insults

Jesse Jackson refuses to apologize, Fla. governor shuts him out

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John R. Smith

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