Support for Obamacare so low, it could drown in a puddle

Who thought this was a good idea?

The Oct. 1 beginning for Obamacare enrollment keeps getting closer, and the news keeps getting worse.

drowninapuddleAverage Americans don’t like it. The unions that fought for it are calling it a “nightmare.” And the IRS employees who are supposed to enforce it don’t even want to be enrolled.

Welcome to President Obama’s proudest achievement.

A new poll published by the National Journal has found 36 percent of Americans want it repealed so it never takes effect, 30 percent are willing to give it some time, and only 27 percent are still optimistic it will work as advertised.

Overall, the poll found, only 18 percent of those polled with think the law will improve their own health care, a third think it will make it worse, and 41 percent think it won’t have much of an impact at all, according to the National Journal.

What makes this worth noting is that the National Journal is decidedly liberal, and decidedly supporting Obamacare. (A column it ran on Wednesday was headlined “The Unprecedented – and contemptible – attempts to sabotage Obamacare” and had the content to match).

In other words, the news is bad even when it’s spun to look as good as possible.

It’s the latest in a month of bad news for the health-reform plan. July started with the announcement that businesses with 50 or more employees would be not be required to provide health insurance for workers.

That led to protests from major Obama-backing unions the Teamsters, the United Food and Commercial Workers and Unite-HERE to protest that the law is giving businesses a reason to keep employees on a part-time basis. In a joint letter, they demanded changes to the law, saying “the unintended consequences of the ACA are severe. Perverse incentives are already creating nightmare scenarios.”

On Thursday, the union representing IRS employees who are supposed to be enforcing the law – a cheery thought – demanding that they be exempted from being forced to join the health-insurance exchanges that are a key part of the law. The National Treasure Employees Union is organizing a letter-writing campaign for members to ask their congressmen to get them out of the law.

So, the public doesn’t like it — and never did. The unions that used to like it say it’s causing “nightmare scenarios,” and the people who are supposed to enforce it think it’s so bade they’re writing Congress to get out of it.

Try to remember. Who thought this was a good idea?

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