Opinion

Miss America 2003 aiming to be a woman of the House

A year ahead of the 2014 elections, one Republican primary just got more interesting.

Former Miss America Erika Harold is challenging U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., for the seat representing the Prairie State’s 13th District, according to a Politico report.

erikaharoldHarold, 33, is a Harvard Law graduate  who practices health-related law and is a firm opponent of Obamacare, Politico reports, mainly because she’s seen in her professional life how the law is making things worse for health-care providers.

“I have a client that is a hospital, and they were trying to figure out how the implementation of Obamacare would affect their ability to hire and what kind of services they can provide and what kind of penalties they would be subject to, and it was difficult to find the answer for them,” Harold told Politico.

“The Obamacare act exacerbated some of the worst parts of our health care system.”

Davis, the man Harold hopes to unseat, is a first-term representative who was drafted to run on the Republican ticket in 2012 after former Rep. Tim Johnson won the party’s primary but retired from Congress.

In last year’s general election, Davis defeated Democrat David Gill, an emergency-room physician and a supporter of even leftier health reform than Obamacare is turning out to be. His spokesman was unavailable for comment Wednesday.

Harold told Politico she’s running against Davis in part because he didn’t win a party primary.

“I view this primary process as being very healthful to the party because we will be able throughout the campaign to debate the issues that are important to the party,” she said in the report.

Harold told Politico she knows her beauty pageant background (she sang opera for the talent competition) is going to be part of the campaign. But she’s more than just a pretty face.

In addition to health-care law, Politico reports, he cases include commercial litigation and representing religious groups in First Amendment cases.

But brains aren’t everything.

Miss America 2003 aiming to be a woman of the House

A year ahead of the 2014 elections, one Republican primary just got more interesting.

Former Miss American Erika Harold is challenging U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., for the seat representing the Prairie State’s 13th District, according to a Politico report.

Harold, 33, is a Harvard Law graduate  who practices health-related law and is a firm opponent of Obamacare, Politico reports, mainly because she’s seen in her professional life how the law is making things worse for health-care providers.

“I have a client that is a hospital, and they were trying to figure out how the implementation of Obamacare would affect their ability to hire and what kind of services they can provide and what kind of penalties they would be subject to, and it was difficult to find the answer for them,” Harold told Politico.

 

“The Obamacare act exacerbated some of the worst parts of our health care system.”

 

Davis, the man Harold hopes to unseat, is a first-term representative who was drafted to run on the Republican ticket in 2012 after former Rep. Tim Johnson won the party’s primary but retired.

 

In last year’s general election, Davis defeated Democrat David Gill, an emergency-room physician and a supporter of even leftier health reform than Obamacare is turning out to be. His spokesman was unavailable for comment Wednesday.

 

Harold told Politico she’s running against Davis in part because he didn’t win a party primary.

 

“I view this primary process as being very healthful to the party because we will be able throughout the campaign to debate the issues that are important to the party,” she said in the report.

 

Harold told Politico she knows her beauty pageant background (she sang opera for the talent competition) is going to be part of the campaign. But she’s more than just a pretty face.

 

In addition to health-care law, Politico reports, he cases include commercial litigation and representing religious groups in First Amendment cases.

 

But brains aren’t everything.

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