Opinion

Obama tells supporters deck will be stacked on immigration

President Barack Obama recently told supporters that immigration reform should be passed — no matter what specific provisions are included in it. Details amenable to the left can and will be worked out later.

Obama-Tyrant
Photo credit www.bob-owens.com

More and more people of all ideological stripes fear that the “Gang of Eight’s” 900-page compromise immigration reform package is an indecipherable labyrinth which, like Obamacare, they will hate after the full effects of it are felt.

Conservatives have been critical of the immigration bill from the start — especially with respect to enforcement and border security. However, those on the left are also raising alarm bells.

Hundreds of demonstrators appeared at a New York City May Day celebration protesting increased border security as well as the 13-year procedure for those here illegally to attain full legal status.

Mark Krikorian blogged in National Review Online Thursday that the concerns of liberals will be met once the bill is passed and signed into law. He notes the following entry in Wednesday’s Washington Post:

The president made clear that he expected the people in the room to support the Senate proposal even if they had doubts about some details, participants said. Once an overarching plan was locked in place by Congress, Obama told the group, the administration would be able to revisit some of their concerns and figure out ways to improve it.

This should come as no surprise — it’s been the president’s pattern of conduct from the start, and has proven not at all difficult for an administration exhibiting little regard for the rule of law.

Can’t pass climate change legislation? Give the Environmental Protection Agency the nod to regulate greenhouse gases and make coal-fired power plants a thing of the past.

Is pro-union card check dead in Congress? Stack the deck on the National Labor Relations Board and tell them, “Have at it.”

What’s more, Krikorian notes that this was precisely the same procedure used to essentially dismantle Reagan’s 1986 immigration law — both enforcement of the law and border security took a back seat to amnesty.

Krikorian notes that:

By the end of FY 1991, 2.5 million illegals were safely amnestied, out of the eventual total of 2.7 million. For that reason, Orrin Hatch and Ted Kennedy felt confident enough to try to repeal the ban on hiring illegals, which was the core of the amnesty-for-enforcement bargain in the 1986 law. In other words, once the pro-amnesty side got what it wanted, it moved to welsh on the deal.

Stated differently, the White House is flipping a double-tailed coin on this one, and conservatives cannot win, no matter how the bill is worded.

The power belongs not to those who write the laws, but rather to he who enforces them.

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