Opinion

‘Easter’ joins ‘Christmas’ as politically unacceptable term

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The “Easter Bunny” is now the “Spring Bunny?” Really? C’mon. Photo credit elmorephotography.wordpress.com

Political correctness, a creature of the 1980s meant to make us more civilized as a society, has made us less so. It was also supposed to help is avoid hurting the feelings of others, but all too often, it has the exact opposite effect.

“PC is dangerous. It muffles people; it puts a muzzle on them,” Dr. Benjamin Carson said in his now-famous speech at this year’s National Prayer Breakfast, according to a CSPAN2 recording.

“It keeps people from discussing important issues while the fabric of this country is being changed.”

I agree completely. And it does even more. It gives others license to correct my behavior when I make what they perceive to be a non-PC remark.

If I say I don’t believe in gay marriage, that doesn’t make me a bigot. It merely means that the term “gay marriage” makes no sense to me. Nor would it make me a homophobe. It’s just that once gay marriage becomes the universal law of the land, it won’t be long before some poor priest, rabbi, minister or imam becomes the target of a lawsuit demanding that he unite a gay couple against the tenets of his faith.

Nonetheless, the moment I state this belief, some Chris Matthews wannabe will inevitably shout, “Bigot! Homophobe!” in a spray of spittle before I’m able to present one word of my reasoning.

This is how we advance civilization?

Political correctness also shames us.

As Americans, we should rejoice over what unites us — our “Americanness” — and celebrate what distinguishes us, including our faith.

Heritage Elementary School in Madison, Ala., decided to rename its annual Easter egg hunt , calling it a Spring hunt “to keep religiously-diverse parents from getting upset,” according to WHNT News.

“We’re just trying to respect and honor everybody’s differences,” the school principal explained.

No, it’s not. It’s doing the exact opposite. By banning the word “Easter,” the school is telling its students loud and clear that Easter is something they should be ashamed of.

If anyone were to mention the word “Rosh Hashanah” or “Yom Kippur” to me, I would want to know something more about the holiday. Not only would the explanation add to my knowledge, but it would help me better understand the person who mentioned it.

“Kids love the bunny,” Lydia Davenport, the Heritage Elementary principal said. “We are just trying to make sure we don’t say ‘the Easter Bunny’ so that we don’t infringe on the rights of others, because people relate the Easter Bunny to religion.”

I have never once seen the Easter Bunny hop down the center isle of church on Easter Sunday.

U[fate:

Superintendent of Madison City Schools Dee Fowler rescinded the principal’s Easter ban.

“These traditions are a part of our rich heritage and I do not see them as infringing on ones’ religious rights,” Fowler wrote in a letter to parents according to Fox News. “Additionally, words such as Christmas and Easter are not banned at our schools.”

Reason prevails. Happy Easter, all.

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