Walmart sues unions to protect Florida stores

Walmart
Photo Credit SpreadLibertyNews.com

Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer, has filed trespassing claims against the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (U.F.C.W.) and other non-profit organizations doing the bidding of the nation’s main retail workers union, to stop disruptive protests at its Florida stores.

Representatives for Walmart say the company filed the lawsuit after multiple warnings, and that it is intended to protect customers and other employees from “further disruptive tactics associated with continued, illegal trespassing,” as reported by Inside Counsel.

Tactics such as U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson (D) handing out turkey sandwiches and letters explaining the right to organize to employees at a local Walmart Thanksgiving night, forcing management to have the police eject him for agitating for unionization.

One of the other defendants named in the lawsuit is Organization United for Respect at Walmart (OUR Walmart), a non-union group of current and former employees who advocate for better pay and benefits.

After failing repeatedly to unionize Walmart stores, U.F.C.W. helped create OUR Walmart, as noted in the New York Times:

Although the Web site of OUR Walmart depicts the organization as a grass-roots effort by Wal-Mart workers, the United Food and Commercial Workers has provided a sizable sum — the union will not say how much — to help the group get started. The union has also paid hundreds of its members to go door to door to urge Wal-Mart workers to join the group.

In addition, the organizers are receiving help from ASGK Public Strategies, a consulting firm long associated with David Axelrod, President Obama’s [then] top political strategist.

Union officials say they hope OUR Walmart will embolden workers and someday pave the way for successful unionization drives at Wal-Mart, according to the New York Times. Those who join are being asked to pay dues of $5 a month.

“You cannot change the standards in the retail and grocery industry unless you also change Wal-Mart,” said Jennifer Stapleton, assistant director of Making Change at Wal-Mart — identified by the Times as a division of the union.

The other non-profit listed as a defendant is Central Florida Jobs With Justice Corp, a proxy for The American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO).

Groups of this nature present themselves as tireless advocates for the “working class,” as the voice for mistreated and disrespected employees, which flies in the face of the reality that when given the opportunity, these employees have repeatedly chosen to reject unions.

Because these groups are not considered unions, it allows them to circumvent oversight and disclosure rules under the National Labor Relations Act and the Labor Management Reporting Disclosure Act.

These non-profit groups also serve to create extremely valuable voting blocs for a myriad of far-left issues and candidates, and are the culmination of a strategy put forth by Richard Trumka, president of AFL-CIO, who is seen as a pioneer in building coalitions and alliances with nonprofit advocacy groups to strengthen union causes.

Trumka, speaking at a University of Illinois event in Chicago earlier this month, acknowledged that union membership has fallen to a historic low in this country and called for a new strategy to target non-union workers.

“We must open up union membership and make the benefits of representation available to all workers,” he said.

Saying “the future is what we make of it,” the union boss added, “We need to change our internal structure… to defend workers’ rights and to be relevant to the 120 million workers in America who have no voice at work. … Our institutions, our unions, will experiment, will adapt to this new age.”

With a myriad of non-union groups already in existence in Central Florida, groups such as Central Florida Jobs With Justice and Mi Familia Vota, which is tied to Service Employees International Union (SEIU), it’s clear that Trumpka’s strategy is well underway.

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