Italy’s high court reverses Amanda Knox acquittal

knox.
Amanda Knox. Photo credit opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com

In a stunning reversal, Italy’s highest court on Tuesday overturned Amanda Knox’s acquittal in the murder of her British roommate and ordered a new trial.

So far, the reasoning behind the court’s decision is unclear. Unlike U.S. appellate courts, Italian courts can make a bare pronouncement, then take up to 90 days to publish what they call the “motivation” behind a particular ruling, according to ABC News.

Shortly after the court published its decision, Knox provided a statement to the media.

“It was painful to receive the news that the Italian Supreme Court decided to send my case back for revision when the prosecution’s theory of my involvement in Meredith’s murder has been repeatedly revealed to be completely unfounded and unfair,” she said, according to ABC News.

“I believe that any questions as to my innocence must be examined by an objective investigation and a capable prosecution,” Knox added. “The prosecution responsible for the many discrepancies in their work must be made to answer for them, for Raffaele’s sake, my sake, and most especially for the sake of Meredith’s family. Our hearts go out to them. No matter what happens, my family and I will face this continuing legal battle as we always have, confident in the truth and with our heads held high in the face of wrongful accusations and unreasonable adversity.”

In a strange twist, another individual with no connection to either Knox or her boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, had been tried and found guilty for the same crime. That man, Rudy Guede, is described by ABC News as an “Ivory Coast drifter” now serving a 16-year sentence for the murder.

Knox’s lawyer, Carlo Dalla Vedova, said a new trial is not likely to start for another year. Knox’s presence isn’t required at her retrial, nor is it likely, Vedova told ABC News. If she is tried in absentia, the Italian authorities won’t seek extradition unless Knox is found guilty.

The United States likely wouldn’t grant extradition given its traditions and abhorrence to double jeopardy, media analysts say.

Read more at ABC News.

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