As database robs real pain patients of privacy, junkies switch to heroin

Drug addicts always find a way. Like gun control, most drug laws do nothing but make life harder for law-abiding citizens.

Shutting down and prosecuting pill mills in Florida was an important achievement, and the law signed by Gov. Rick Scott in June 2011 helped put those drug pushers out of business.

But Scott originally opposed the bill because it established a prescription drug database that many conservatives believe would violate the public’s right to privacy, while making it harder for legitimate patients suffering real pain to receive proper medication.

In February 2009, as a blogger for the Sun Sentinel, I wrote:

The State of Florida should not have the right to track our private and legal relationships with our doctors.

As it is now, if you get your face caught in a blender and your leg eaten by a wood chipper, you’re lucky if the doctor tosses you a Tylenol after sewing you back together.

The bill is a bad idea that takes away more of our freedom without doing much to stop illegal drug use. Junkies are an ingenious bunch and they will figure out a way to beat the system or they will just switch to heroin or cocaine, both of which are widely available despite being illegal.

I bring this up now because of an article by Nicole Brochu of the Sun Sentinel, Heroin taking oxy’s place for more addicts.

Turns out, I was right. Now that pain pills are harder to get, addicts have switched to heroin.

Meanwhile, the drug database was established, despite Scott’s initial opposition, taking more of our freedoms and privacy away, since anyone with a doctor’s script for meds went into the system.

But not the junkies. They switched to heroin and left us holding the bag.

Jack Furnari

Jack Furnari

President at BizPac Review
Jack Furnari is a founding partner, writer and CEO of BizPac Review.
Jack Furnari

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