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Hezbollah’s unholy alliance with Mexico’s drug cartels

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Hezbollah in MexicoRadical Islam has arrived in the United States. A North Carolina congresswoman has been warning us of this for years. The press ridiculed her, the government ignored her, and the Council on American-Islamic Relations twisted her words — but she was right all along.

U.S. Rep. Sue Myrick, R-N.C., is chairwoman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence: Terrorism, Human Intelligence, Analysis and Counterintelligence, and her warnings going back 10 tears are only now being taken seriously. Evidence that the Lebanon-based terrorist group Hezbollah has gained a foothold in the United States came to light with the attempted assassination of a Saudi diplomat last year.

Last week, Mansour J. Arbabsiar, an Iranian-American residing in Texas, pleaded guilty to conspiring to hire assassins from a Mexican drug cartel for $1.5 million to kill the ambassador, Adel al-Jubeir.

Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, working with its covert operation group, the Qods Force, planned the Saudi diplomat’s assassination, according to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder.

Since at least “January 2010, the [Iranian] Quds Force decided that it and Hezbollah, its primary terrorist proxy, would embark on a new campaign of violence targeting not only Israel but U.S. and other Western targets as well,” said Matthew Levitt, writing for Foreign Policy.

Hezbollah, according to Myrick, has been gaining entry into the United States through Mexican drug cartels for years. That’s why she has been urging the Department of Homeland Security to keep an eye on both groups. She’s all but given up hope.

“I don’t have a lot of faith in the Department of Homeland Security,” Myrick told Fox News. “They should be looking at these groups in Mexico much more closely.”

Janet NapolitanoDHS Secretary Janet Napolitano did admit to Myrick that Hezbollah has had a presence in Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay going back decades, as well as “ties to individuals involved in illicit activities in the region,” according to Myerick, Napolitano took care to avoid connecting Mexican cartels to the terrorist organization, however.

Although Homeland Security may not see a connection, the Drug Enforcement Administration isn’t blind.

“The dangerous connection between drug trafficking and terrorism cannot be overstated, and this case is yet another example of DEA’s unique role in identifying potentially deadly networks that wish to harm innocent Americans and our allies worldwide,” DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhar told Fox News.

Southern border states also aren’t oblivious.

“The Arizona Department of Homeland Security has indicated there are elements of Middle Eastern Islamic extremist groups operating in Mexico,” Matthew Benson, communications director for Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, was quoted in a Fox News interview. “From the governor’s standpoint, it is critical to have a secure border for criminal elements who would take advantage of a porous border, especially like the one we have in Arizona.”

Nor are local authorities blind. A Tuscon, Arizona police report dated Sept. 20, 2010, reads in part:

Based on a study done by Georgetown University, the number of immigrants from Lebanon and Syria living in Mexico exceeds 200,000. Along with Iran, Syria is one of Hezbollah’s strongest financial and political supporters, and Lebanon is its country of origin.

Sue MyerickThe large Middle Eastern population in Mexico makes it easy for Hezbollah members to blend in and establish contact with Mexican cartels.

Homeland Security continues to balk.

“Given the evidence available, it only makes sense that DHS should, at the very least, investigate the presence of Hezbollah along our southern border,” Myrick said.

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