Mobs who invade our diplomatic missions are murderers, not demonstrators

Why do we bend over backwards being nice to people who hate our guts? Why do we continue being tolerant to intolerance? Why do we always meet apathy with empathy?

I got a call from my friend, Kate, the other day. She expressed scorn and disbelief that both the government and the media kept referring to the mob that invaded our embassies and consulates as “demonstrators.” “They’re not demonstrators,” she said. “They’re thugs and murderers. Demonstrators carry signs. These people carry guns.”

She was referring to events carried out at our Egyptian embassy and Benghazi, Libya, consulate, on Sept. 11 of all days, allegedly to protest an anti-Islamic movie trailer made by a California independent filmmaker.

Kate was right. And, I’m sorry to say, I hadn’t given it any thought until her call. Even outspoken FOX News anchor Megyn Kelly referred to the armed invasion of our Cairo embassy as a “protest.”

Demonstrations and acts of civil disobedience have a long, rich history, both in this country, as with the civil rights marches of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and abroad, as with Mahatma Gandhi’s anti-British imperialism demonstrations in India. They all have one thing in common — if anyone gets hurt, it will be the demonstrators, not those being demonstrated against.

Not so here. As Kate noted, these mobs didn’t carry signs — they carried weapons, including rocket launchers. They scaled the Cairo embassy walls, shredded our flag and replaced it with one associated with Islamic terrorists.

In Libya, mobs kidnapped U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and dragged his unconscious body through the streets of Benghazi. They later murdered the ambassador and three consular employees. These aren’t acts of protestation by any standard — these are acts of war carried out by barbarians and should be described as such by the media, and considered so by the government.

The immediate response from the diplomatic community was to, in essence, apologize for the exercise of free speech exhibited by the filmmaker. This is the same free speech, incidentally, that the mobs looted, burned and raped to attain during the so-called Arab Spring. A few hours later, the U.S. State Department gave more of the same. Thankfully, the White House response wasn’t so conciliatory, but it came many hours later — a case of too little, too late.

Another issue I find disturbing is that these mobs of thugs demand that we, as a sovereign nation, conform to their Sharia law. They demand that we set aside our own Bill of Rights and history of freedom and liberty to adopt their law as it pertains to Islam and depictions of Mohammed. Although this country was founded upon Judeo-Christian principles, we elevate neither Judaism nor Christianity to that level. Why should Islam have that distinction?

In July, the BBC reported that a Mali, Africa, couple was buried up to their necks and then stoned to death by Islamists for the crime of engaging in sex outside the bonds of marriage. It’s hard for me to imagine an act more brutal or barbaric. Yet no one here stormed the Mali embassy.

Why do we bend over backwards being nice to people who hate our guts? I suppose the answer is one part diplomacy and another political correctness. I propose we maintain our diplomacy and ditch the P.C.

The following video was taken at the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt. As you view it, answer this question for yourself: Is this a group of demonstrators, or a mob of thugs?

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