Gun control radicals come out of the woodwork

Never make an important life decision while in the heat of passion. We hear that advice often enough, but just as often, we are called on to disregard it.

The bodies weren’t even removed from the Aurora, Colo., movie theater before the speculators began speculating and the rabble-rousers began rousing the rabble to action. ABC News almost immediately implied that the tea party was somehow to blame for the incident. A few hours later, the network retracted the accusation.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg raised the gun control specter, issuing a challenge to both President Obama and his likely opponent, Mitt Romney: “Soothing words are nice, but maybe it’s time that the two people who want to be president of the United States stand up and tell us what they’re going to do about it.” Neither took the bait.

Not to be outdone, transplanted-Brit-turned-commentator, CNN’s Piers Morgan, tweeted, “America has got to do something about its gun laws. Now is the time.” Morgan later invited on his program film director Michael Moore, who suggested that if one of the president’s children had been shot in that Colorado theater, he would not be saying, “The existing guns laws are enough.”

At the other end of the spectrum, FOX News reported that Colorado gun sales skyrocketed in the wake of the shooting. Although I support gun ownership, I can’t imagine that every single one of those purchasers had been properly trained beforehand. Those who weren’t should consider themselves yet another tragedy in the making.

Conservative pundits chose to answer gun control advocates directly. Talk radio host Mark Levinchallenged Bloomberg this way: “You go without armed bodyguards, and I’ll think about going without my guns.” Columnist and blogger Michelle Malkin responded to Morgan’s tweet with one of her own: “Armed CO citizens have SAVED lives in mass shootings. Get educated.”

As it turned out, the clearest, most rational voice of all was one that had every right to be emotional. Jordan Ghawi, whose sister, Jessica Ghawi, died in the Aurora massacre, was asked by MSNBC’s Michael Dawson whether he planned to campaign for stricter gun laws. Ghawi said he had no interest in “politicizing” the tragedy. He went on to say:

Here’s the thing. We can try to politicize this and make some sort of polarizing debate and make this a tenet of the election. That’s not what we’re here to do right now. We’re here to celebrate the lives of the victims that have been lost. If somebody wants to do harm to somebody, they’re gonna find a way to do it, whether it be with a weapon such as a rifle or whether it be with any sort of means. We should actually start to think about why people are doing this, and the reason people are doing this is they want their names out there.

FOX News business and financial commentator Neil Cavuto took a short detour from his normally traveled economic freeway to offer his own perspective. Echoing and expanding upon Ghawi’s statement, he asked what would change if stricter firearm laws were in place. He gives his answer in the video below

 

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