Eric Holder’s ‘fast and furious’ demise

Eric-Holder“Fast and furious” isn’t just the name of a flawed government gun-running scheme. It’s also turning out to be the speed of U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder’s fall from grace.

Pressure for Holder to resign has been mounting daily amid growing evidence that he knew details of the failed gun-running operation almost from its inception. Fast and Furious was a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives scheme that ultimately resulted in firearms being supplied to Mexican drug cartels. Those same guns later killed two U.S. agents and at least 200 Mexican citizens.

Holder testified under oath before Congress that he first knew of the operation at about the same time as the general public. When memos and emails surfaced suggesting that he knew of the details much earlier, the attorney general first stated he “misunderstood the question,” then later corrected himself to say he doesn’t read all his memos. If it hasn’t already done so, Congress is expected to issue a subpoena for Holder’s appearance soon.

Although Holder maintains his innocence, his detractors say he’s been lying about his knowledge and participation from the start. So which is it? Although we may never learn the truth with certainty, an examination of his character may tell us what is probable.

new black panthersHolder’s mettle was first tested by the New Black Panther case, which left-wing lawyer-turned-publisher Bartle Bull called “the most blatant form of voter intimidation I’ve ever seen.” It involved nightstick-toting Black Panther members harassing white voters at a poll during the 2008 presidential election. When winning the case became a mere formality, Holder dropped the prosecution. Later, a Justice Department lawyer testified that the matter was terminated because the suspects were black and their victims were white. Perhaps it’s time for our attorney general to review the last four words in the Pledge of Allegiance: “and justice for all.” He would also do well to research the writings of Martin Luther King Jr., who envisioned a colorblind society.

ACORN-Vote-FraudWhen the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now was caught red-handed engaging in voter registration fraud, Holder’s Justice Department chose to sit on the sidelines, leaving prosecution to individual states. When evidence of ACORN’s fraud became irrefutable, Congress prohibited ACORN or any group associated with it from receiving federal funding. Holder’s Justice Department later lifted the ban to allow the group to continue receiving funds for contractual obligations already made. That pretty much includes everything ACORN would have received before the ban. One can’t help but recall that the attorney general’s boss, Barack Obama, was once deeply associated with ACORN. That begs the question: “What influence did that association have on the decision to take it easy on ACORN?”

Commenting on the Fast and Furious case, U.S. Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., said, “It seems like this is the Moe, Curly and Larry show. And we’re looking for Larry.” It’d be too easy to say we’ve found our “Larry” in Eric Holder. Instead, I’ll refer to the attorney general’s own remarks. When speaking on race relations, he once accused us of being “a nation of cowards.”  I have to believe that he imagined himself looking in the mirror when he said those words.

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