Opinion

Race, lies and Presidency 5

“Now even as we speak, there are those who are preparing to divide us, the spin masters, the negative ad peddlers who embrace the politics of anything goes. Well, I say to them tonight, there is not a liberal America and a conservative America — there is the United States of America. There is not a black America and a white America and Latino America and Asian America — there’s the United States of America.”

Those were Barack Obama’s words in his keynote speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention. Given the language, one would think his election four years later would have brought the nation together in a new age of racial accord. Instead, political correctness and racial divide have splintered us into every sub-group imaginable. We’ve become a hyphenated society. We’re African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Irish-Americans and so on.

Taking advantage of the division, President Obama’s 2012 campaign strategy seems to be based on“us vs. them” class warfare. He’s concentrating on the hyphenated American ethnic minorities.

Uglier than the splintering is the name-calling. Members of the Congressional Black Caucus recently accused the tea party of being a lynch mob and said they can all “go to hell.” It’s even reached the point where, like sharks in a feeding frenzy, they’re devouring their own — and often contradicting themselves in the process.

Actor Morgan Freeman recently accused President Obama of ramping up the racial divide, but then went on to say that those who disagree with the president are racists.  Similarly, U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, said the conservative media should “shut up” and “stop playing racial politics.” Moments later, she opined that President Obama should supportbuying African-American, as opposed to just plain “American.” Don’t these people ever listen to themselves?

Last August, “members of the Congressional Black Caucus said they’re done waiting for Barack Obama to fight their battles for them.” Speaking at a CBC dinner a month later, the president, in what’s been described as an attack of his own, told the CBC to ignore the GOP attacks and “stop complaining, stop grumbling, stop crying.”

There is, however, one political sector that doesn’t seem at all angry — the Republicans. I was a delegate at the Florida Republican Presidency 5 straw poll and Conservative Political Action Conference, a combined three-day event. The delegates and attendees were composed of every religious and ethnic group imaginable, yet we never considered ourselves as anything but Americans first, and Republicans second. Although our swollen feet ached, our reddened eyes were bleary and our stomachs sometimes rebelled from eating on the run, each participant could be recognized by a friendly grin and an aura of excitement.

This disparity wasn’t lost on one Hill blogger, Sam Youngman, who wrote, “Despite the intense outreach Obama is now conducting, there will never be a close relationship between Obama and the left. He will have to continue to look upon George W. Bush’s loyal conservative following with envy.”

Then there was the straw poll itself. The election results, although significant, paled in comparison to the manner in which the mainstream media spun them. We all know that businessman Herman Cain overwhelmingly won the poll. Although he garnered more votes than the two presumed frontrunners combined, ABC News reported that “nobody won.” The media also felt duty-bound to emphasize that Mr. Cain is a pizza company executive. Given the fact that “The Hermanator” is black, ABC’s dismissal of his astounding victory could be viewed as racist. I’ll just call it arrogant, patronizing and unabashedly partisan.

We may be a nation of immigrants, but what binds us is our American identity. The president, his party and the media would serve our country well by remembering that in the upcoming election. I’m not, however, holding my breath.

 

 

From left to right:

Kenneth Guntkowski, Mike Barnett, Michael Dorstewitz at Pr

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