‘I’ is for immigration, not invasion

“Our borders are secure.” We’ve heard that line repeated ad nauseam by Congressman Pete Stark, D-Calif., Barack Obama and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano. The question of border security was recently put to the test — and failed miserably — when three truckloads of armed Mexican soldiers arrived unannounced at a border checkpoint and were granted entry into the United States. Apparently, those troops saw Napolitano on CNN’s “State of the Union” when she asserted that crossing the border illegally is not a crime. Illegally is not a crime? Is she, by chance, related to Debbie Wasserman Schultz? By the way, did I mention that these were Mexican troops, and that they were armed?

John Adams proclaimed that one of America’s unique traits is that we are “agovernment of laws and not of men.” This characteristic adds a measure of predictability to our lives, giving us the confidence to purchase real estate, shop for a new car or start a business. Circumventing the law, conversely, leads to chaos and insecurity.

The president sees it differently. When he can’t get his way with Congress, he has a penchant for using a back door. When he couldn’t pass cap and trade, he had the EPA regulate greenhouse gases. When card check failed to pass congressional scrutiny, he attempted to get the National Labor Relations Board  to make it easier to unionize companies. Now that the DREAM Act has failed passage numerous times, he got U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to issue a memorandum easing prosecutions on various classes of non-legal residents – the same classes covered under the DREAM Act.

Predictably, the memo has created uncertainty and chaos within ICE’s rank and file, prompting them to warn us to brace for what may be coming down the pike.

We’ve often heard that our immigration procedure is long, arduous and complicated. There’s a reason for that. Immigration is based on the applicant demonstrating self-reliance and not becoming a burden to society. This takes time to verify. The 9-11 attack on our soil created yet another item of concern — terrorism. Crossing the border unannounced and in the dead of night creates anxiety and should be cause for concern.

Congress and the president take note: The “I” in ICE stands for immigration, not invasion. If you think the procedure is flawed, then fix it. Blanket amnesty, however, is not the answer. Amnesty is nothing short of an admission of your own failure. We know it’s not easy. It may even interfere with your tee time, cocktail hour and re-election campaign. When you applied for the job, however, you said you were both capable and eager to tackle the tough issues. It’s time for you to prove it. If you can’t, there are plenty of others ready to take your place.

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