Powered by Topple

Amnesty-Lite Up For Vote This Week

Powered by Topple

dream-act-mask-e1280139031560Editor’s Note – When you consider the reasons listed below why this Senator or that Senator may not support this legislation, the one thing consistently missing is any reference to what the people of this country want.

There are still a lot of folks trying to understand what is the driving force behind the tea party movement and it really comes down to one simple thing – the will of the people mean nothing to those who purport to represent us.  And Bob Bennet of Utah was perplexed when he lost his primary?

Something else you will pick up on in the article is that there’s no reference to what exactly is in the DREAM Act.  Basically, it is amnesty lite, extending a path to citizenship to those who have been here for five years or longer and were under the age 16 when they came to America.  What you will hear even less about is that this is extended to illegal immigrants up to the age of 35.

Of course, you must verify that you meet the ‘criteria’ – A few questions;  if you came here illegally, meaning you are not documented, how do you prove when you came?  How do you prove how long you were here?  Is there anyway to know if you left and came back several times during the time period in question?

And an even more important question, how much confidence do you have in a federal government that is permeated with pro-Amnesty ideologues to accurately verify eligibility?  If this passes, it will rank right up there with ObamaCare as one of the greatest travesties inflicted upon the American people and will offer further proof that we are no longer a nation of laws.

 

Key Dem Senators Not Ruling Out Yes Votes On DREAM Act

By J. Taylor Rushing
The Hill

Senate Democrats who blocked an immigration bill in 2007 say they are undecided on how to vote on the measure this week.

Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) plans to attach the controversial DREAM Act to the defense authorization bill. But it’s unclear if it can attract 60 votes.

The DREAM Act, introduced by Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), would grant U.S. citizenship to certain children of illegal immigrants who came to the country before the age of 16.

Democrats helped block the bill three years ago when it fell eight votes short on a procedural motion. While some Republicans supported that motion, eight Democrats voted no, including the late Sen. Robert Byrd (W.Va.) and Sens. Max Baucus (Mont.), Mary Landrieu (La.), Mark Pryor (Ark.), Kent Conrad (N.D.), Claire McCaskill (Mo.), Jon Tester (Mont.) and Byron Dorgan (N.D.).

Five of those senators — Conrad, Dorgan, McCaskill, Pryor and Landrieu — told The Hill this week they haven’t made up their minds about this week’s vote.

“It’s not one of the things I’m focused on right now, but at the appropriate time I will review it,” Conrad said.

“I’ll take a look at how it’s constructed. I haven’t made a judgment about it,” said Dorgan.

McCaskill was slightly more optimistic.

“It depends on the language,” she said. “I have some problems with the way the bill was drafted last time. I am certainly more comfortable with the notion that somebody who has been in the country for five years and who came here through the fault of their parents and not their fault ought to get a green card to serve in the military. I’m very sympathetic to that. I’m just looking at the drafting now.”

But Pryor is leaning no.

“I’ll have to look at it and see, but my inclination is probably to vote against it again,” he said. “But I want to look at it and see. I know there’s been some changes.”

A Landrieu spokesman said the Louisiana senator has not yet taken a position on the bill.

GOP senators who backed the 2007 motion are planning to vote no this time around.

Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah is opposed to the bill, for example, as is his colleague, Sen. Robert Bennett.

“I support the DREAM Act as free standing legislation, but putting it in a bill that has a number of objectionable aspects is not something I support,” Bennett said in a statement. “If [Senate Majority Leader] Harry Reid [D-Nev.] brings it to the floor as a stand-alone bill, I will vote for it.”

But proponents of the DREAM Act say that GOP arguments about process fall short. They note that 12 Republicans voted for the cloture motion in 2007, pointing out that – just like this year — the DREAM Act is a proposed an amendment to the defense authorization measure.

Bennett’s position mirrors that of several other Republicans.

“This is rank politics,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who has previously been an ally to Democrats on immigration reform. “There’s no way I’m going to vote for the DREAM Act in isolation on the defense bill. And if they think I’m the problem, they’re wrong. I will support good, comprehensive immigration reform, but not like this.”

Read More – http://thehill.com/homenews/senate/119661-key-dem-senators-not-ruling-out-yes-votes-on-dream-act

Tom Tillison

Comments

Latest Articles