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What the Eye Won't See

What The Eye Won’t See

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By Allen Wilson

This weekend marks the 9th anniversary of the worst terrorist attack on American Soil in U.S. history. It marks the first anniversary of a march on Washington to reclaim the government, by the people, for the people. We’ll hear much on the news about both this weekend but what is maybe more important is what we will not hear, and what we will not see.

Those news outlets that wish to divert attention from a political rebellion against the government will simply focus on the 9/11 attacks and give only a passing glimpse of the other events marking these days. What will be missed are rallies and marches across the country to show support of a movement that simply will not go away.

Yes, there is a large rally in Washington D.C. this weekend, but there are also rallies in Onawa, Iowa and Omaha, Nebraska, and right here in Orlando, Florida. Rallies and Marches are being held from the southern border to the northern tier states. We won’t see many or actually any of these displays.

The eye won’t see the movement of the people but the heart will feel it. That statement actually has a double meaning for me. A few weeks ago I suffered a heart attack – a bolt from the blue. Today as I listened to my cardiologist explain the recovery regimen I could not help but draw a parallel between my heart and my political conscience. For years I had taken them both for granted and in that bolt from the blue realized that I had erred and would be paying the price for the rest of my life.

Many of us realize that our political health has been sorely neglected but we are ready, willing, and able to make changes. We know it will not always be easy and that it may require some sacrifices. We may have to settle for compromises in the beginning but we will continue to strive towards our goal. What of the next generation? Will they be content to sit on the couch or on the bar stool or play tennis or Wii? How can we explain to them the importance of caring for their political health while they are young?

I think Marco Rubio has been doing a good job of setting an example in his latest commercials. His parents knew what it was to lose their country and it made an impact on him. I had that conversation a few weeks ago with several young people. As I listened to them explain that it wasn’t worth their time to worry about politics. My only comment was a confession of sorts on how I had failed myself, failed them too. I had not paid attention and now they would have to pay the price. The fault was mine; I did the crime they would have to do the time. And I apologized.

Surprisingly, it had an impact. Rather than lecturing them on their mistakes I had owned up to mine. I had painted a picture of their lives and their toil that was due to my neglect. They began to ask what I would have done differently.

What we will not see this weekend are other adults taking responsibility for the mistakes they have made in building the future. We won’t see apologies from the Washington elite or the talking heads on the national news channels. But, if we look beyond them to the streets and county parks and covering the National Mall we will see millions of apologies from those that will. Our message to those that don’t see the challenges that lie ahead is not what those people that march are doing. The true message is what they failed to do which has now called them to this purpose.

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