The Stakes In The Health Care War

ObamaCareEditor’s Note – A recent question was posed to voters; Where’s all the rage over the passage of ObamCare?

One only has to look at the polls to see that it’s still there.  In what can be seen as a potentially encouraging sign for conservatives, voters are making it clear that the healthcare issue is still of paramount concern to them.  It seems inevitable that this concern will be voiced at the ballot box in November.

Apparently, the ‘right wing domestic terrorists’ that opposed nationalized healthcare have learned a thing or two over the past year and a half, and now understand that the most potent weapon they have is their vote.  Which explains why so many conservative grassroots groups are heavily engaged in the election process right now – setting a standard among candidates, educating voters and, most importantly, motivating friends, family and neighbors to get out and vote.

Indeed, November is coming!

 

The Stakes In The Health Care War

By Douglas E. Shoen
Politico.com

Despite lofty predictions that a broad-based Democratic constituency would be activated by the health care reform bill, recent polling shows that the bill has been a disaster for the party — with near 60 percent of voters saying that they oppose the measure.

In recent months, as voters express anger across-the-board with Washington, there may well be no single initiative as unpopular as the administration’s health care reform bill.

Weekly Rasmussen Reports polling shows that more than half the electorate has consistently supported repeal of the measure since passage. And the latest Rasmussen health care poll from Monday shows 55 percent of Americans supporting repeal, and just 38 percent supporting the bill.

Despite the many good predictions, this bill has created big problems for both President Barack Obama and the Democratic Party.

The party’s favorability has dropped 20 points in the past year, as reflected in two Pew Research Center and CBS News polls. A swing of this proportion is usually considered monumental — and the implications in November are likely to be substantial.

Put simply, the manner in which major issues like health care play out in the fall are likely to determine the November outcome.

If the administration and its PR foot soldiers are unable sell the health care bill and change the widespread perception that the legislation helps with deficit reduction and reigning in spending, Obama’s current standing — and his reelection hopes — as well as the success for the Democratic Party in this fall’s midterm, are likely to continue to deteriorate.

In a June Washington Post/ABC News Survey, 29 percent of Americans said that they are inclined to support their House representative in November, even lower than in 1994 — when voters swept the Democrats out of power after 40 years as the House majority. Voters said they would rather vote for a House candidate who has never served in Congress, according to a recent Gallup poll, than for a candidate who has been in Congress, by 60 percent to 32 percent. A historically low 50 percent of voters said their member of Congress deserves re-election.

While this anti-incumbent mood is going to push voters toward the Republicans — voters are no more confident about the Republican leadership’s agenda. In the June Washington Post/ABC News poll, six in 10 respondents said they have a negative view of the policies put forward by the Republican minority in Congress, and only one-third said they trust Republicans over Democrats to handle the nation’s main problems.

Moreover, the majority of voters who say they favor Republican control are not saying this because they support the GOP and its candidates. Rather, it is opposition to the agenda of the administration and the Democratic Party that is driving the Republican lead.
Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0810/40946.html#ixzz0wPCnBZuM

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Tom Tillison

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