Texas woman’s rampage destroys two Andy Warhol paintings, smashes statues after bad first date, lawsuit claims

A Dallas socialite is refuting claims she destroyed a Texas attorney’s exclusive art collection in a drunken rage — and she’d better hope she can prove it.

(Houston Police Department via AP)

Two original Andy Warhol pieces were allegedly destroyed when liquid was poured on them, along with several sculptures that were used as projectiles in the home of a prominent Houston lawyer.

Lindy Lou Layman, 29, was slapped with a charge of criminal mischief by the art collection’s owner, trial attorney Anthony Buzbee, who’s claiming the pieces were worth at least $300,000.

Layman’s lawyer came back swinging, when his client appeared in court on Tuesday, the Houston Chronicle reported.

“We certainly disagree with Mr. Buzbee’s rendition of the facts when he spoke to the media and we disagree with what was said in probable cause court,” Layman’s defense attorney Justin Keiter said.

Police allege that Layman threw two sculptures and destroyed three original paintings at Buzzbee’s mansion, according to the Chron.

Buzbee rose to national recognition when he successfully defended former Texas Gov. Rick Perry from an abuse of power charge. It was Layman’s first date with the high-profile lawyer when she allegedly became intoxicated and shattered the sculptures and poured wine on the paintings.

Tony Buzbee. (AP Photo/Tamir Kalifa)

Keitner maintains that his client is being unfairly maligned in the court of public opinion. He didn’t give specifics on Tuesday, but said his client’s side of the story will come out in a future court date.

“Our side has the rest of the story,” Keiter said after District Judge Kelli Johnson set what the Chron called “typical” bond conditions.

“She’s weathering the storm of the intense media scrutiny that she has endured,” Keiter said. “She’s a great person.”

Lindy Lou Layman, right, stands with her defense attorney Justin Keiter after making an appearance in court. (Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via Associated Press) Photo via Fox News.com.

The pretty socialite was set free on $30,000 bail and is prohibited from using drugs or alcohol, the Chron reported. Layman was ordered to have absolutely no contact with Buzbee.

While the district court’s bond conditions seemed “typical” the sentence Layman faces seems anything but.

The level of charge is determined by the value of the objects destroyed, the Chron reported. Layman was charged at the maximum, which is a felony, and faces life in prison if convicted.

The following video of Layman appearing in court made its way to YouTube:

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