NRA hails the House’s passage of Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act

One of liberals’ worst nightmares is on the verge of coming true.

The House on Wednesday passed a bill that makes it easier for gun owners to conceal carry across state lines. The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act made it through on a 231-198 vote.

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The National Rifle Association immediately heralded the vote as a historic win for the Second Amendment.

“This vote marks a watershed moment for Second Amendment rights,” said Chris W. Cox, executive director of the NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action. “The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act is the culmination of a 30-year movement recognizing the right of all law-abiding Americans to defend themselves, and their loved ones, including when they cross state lines.”

The bill, H.R. 38, will allow Americans who legally conceal carry firearms to do so in other states.

It also addresses the modern issue of mass shootings by giving state and government agencies incentive to update the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) with the most current information.

The tragic killing of 26 innocent people at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas last month prompted dialogue about bureaucratic failing when it became known that the killer, Devin Kelley, was only able to legally purchase firearms because the Air Force failed to report his domestic violence conviction to NICS.

A woman kneels in prayer at a makeshift memorial for the First Baptist Church shooting victims. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip).

Another feature of H.R. 38 is an expedited process for removing names that have been erroneously submitted to NICS. The bill requires a response to an appeal in no more than 60 days.

“This bill ensures that all law-abiding citizens in our great country can protect themselves in the manner they see fit without accidentally running afoul of the law,” Cox stated. “We now call on the Senate to take up and pass this critical legislation.”

A similar bill is currently pending in the Senate Judiciary Committee. Democrats are largely opposed to the bill. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) blasted the vote on Twitter.

But news of the bill’s approval has been enthusiastically received among conservatives.

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