NFL will cut breast cancer, military charity funds to pay for players’ $89 million social justice activism: Source

Capitulating to the antics of players disrespecting the national anthem, the National Football League agreed to donate nearly $90 million over the next 7 years to support left-of-center social justice causes.

If that act alone isn’t enough to raise eyebrows, where the NFL is reportedly planning to get the money certainly will.

According to one of the athletes at the forefront of the protests, San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid [#35 in the photograph below], the windfall will come at the expense of the league’s planned financial support for breast cancer and military charities.

AP / Marcio Jose Sanchez

“In the discussion that we had, Malcolm conveyed to us—based on discussions that he had with the NFL — that the money would come from funds that are already allocated to breast cancer awareness and Salute to Service,” Reid told Slate.

Salute to Service supports military personnel and raises awareness of their sacrifices.

“So it would really be no skin off the owners’ backs: They would just move the money from those programs to this one,” he continued.

The player protests, sparked when former 49ers player Colin Kaepernick began protesting racial oppression in America, originated in the liberal city of San Francisco, which found itself in the news this week as a jury acquitted an illegal immigrant who was deported five times for the death of Kate Steinle.

Getty colin kaepernick kneel

(Photo by Michael Zagaris/San Francisco 49ers/Getty Images)

Reid, who is concerned the league is trying to co-opt the players’ social justice efforts,  resigned from a players coalition formed in response to the protests over the decision to shift money earmarked for other programs.

“We didn’t agree with that, because we weren’t trying to cut other worthy programs,” he said. “They moved forward anyways.”

Reid also suggested the league offered the money to quell the protests — in effect, to buy the players’ silence in the face of a national boycott, plummeting TV ratings and empty seats in stadiums across America.

The Players Coalition is led by the Philadelphia Eagles’ Malcolm Jenkins and retired wide receiver Anquan Boldin, and Jenkins said Thursday he will cease to raise his fist during the playing of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” Slate reported.

“When [Jenkins] asked me if I would end the protest in exchange for the donation and to announce the partnership for the proposal on Thursday, I was like, ‘Dude, no,’” Reid said.

NFL players look to be learning the hard way that when it comes to politics, achieving a consensus is harder than it appears. Perhaps they should stick to what they do best, playing football.

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Tom Tillison

Tom Tillison

Tom is a grassroots activist who distinguished himself as one of the top conservative bloggers in Florida before joining BizPac Review.
Tom Tillison

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