Schools stop naming valedictorians to protect students from ‘unhealthy competition’

The naming of a class valedictorian has long been a hallmark tradition of American high schools. And no graduation ceremony is complete without the valedictorian speech.

But the “fairness” crowd that has ruined everything from little league sports to ladies nights at bars has made erasing the valedictorian their latest cause.

Schools across the county are undoing the practice of honoring their highest achieving student, as reported by Fox News. Administrators at such schools say the tradition promotes “unhealthy competition.”

Approximately half of schools in the US have enacted measures such as naming multiple valedictorians per graduating class.

It wouldn’t be surprising to learn about them increasing the number of valedictorians for each new class in a never-ending effort to reward more students. Eventually, they’ll simply let the entire class share in the honor!

Some schools in Virginia, North Carolina, and New York have gotten rid of the title completely. What these schools fail to realize is that by trying to protect the feelings of average and failing students, they’re punishing those who work hardest.

High achievers at these schools have called on the title to be brought back. Ryan Walters, a North Carolina student at the top of his class, doesn’t hold back in criticizing his school for folding to the political correctness police.

“I think it’s pretty stupid, and I don’t think it’s fair,” Walters said. “”Wake County is recognizing mediocrity, not greatness.”

Interestingly, the school bureaucrats who come up with these policies often do so against the wishes of students, teachers, and parents. It’s a mentality of “I know what’s best for you.”

At Melrose High School in Massachusetts, the school committee voted in 2014 to eliminate the valedictorian title out of concerns it was causing “stress” among the student body, as covered by Wicked Local.

In May of this year, the title was reinstated after showed 87 percent of students and 95 percent of faculty were in favor of honoring the school’s top learner.

It seems teenagers are actually pretty reasonable when not indoctrinated by radical leftists posing as educators. Kids intuitively understand that failure may be devastating, but it’s the possibility of losing that makes winning that much more rewarding.

Maybe these administrators should get of their offices and listen to real people for a change.

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