Will Army bases cave? People call on military to rename Confederate soldier properties

The Army is now at the center of the wave of activism against remnants of the Confederacy.

Since the riots in Charlottesville, where white supremacists clashed with far left agitators, Confederate statues and symbols, as well as those of non-Confederate white people, have been removed from the public square, or vandalized.

A statue of former Philadelphia Mayor Frank Rizzo was spray painted with “Black Power,” President Abraham Lincoln’s statue was torched, Duke University removed a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, New York City vowed to remove subway tiles that kind of resemble Confederate battle flags, a peace monument, that was mistaken for a Confederate monument, was destroyed and a CNN commentator called for the removal of statues and monuments of the Founding Fathers.

Some are now wondering if the Army will change the names of 10 of its bases, located mainly in the South, that are named for confederate soldiers.

New York Dem. Rep. Yvette Clarke introduced a bill this month that would force the renaming of any property run by the Pentagon that is named for anyone who fought for the Confederacy.

“It is only right that we remove these names associated with the terrible perpetuation of slavery,” New York Rep. Grace Meng said of the bill, titled “Honoring Real Patriots Act,” NBC News reported.

“If our society is going to be inclusive, we have to remove some of the stench we’ve had to live with,” National Association for Black Veterans regional commander Richard Kingsberry said. “You honor those things that bring us together.”

A similar call to rename the bases was made after domestic terrorist Dylann Roof murdered members of an African-American church in 2015.

At the time, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren told Time Magazine that renaming the bases had not been discussed.

“Every Army installation is named for a soldier who holds a place in our military history. Accordingly, these historic names represent individuals, not causes or ideologies,” Brig. General Malcom B. Frost told MSNBC at the time.

The bases in question include Fort Bragg in North Carolina, Fort Polk, Fort Rucker and Camp Beauregard in Louisiana, Fort Lee, Fort A.P. Hill and Fort Pickett in Virginia, Fort Hood in Texas and Fort Benning and Fort Gordon in Georgia.

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Carmine Sabia

Carmine Sabia

Carmine Sabia Jr started his own professional wrestling business at age 18 and went on to become a real estate investor. Currently he is a pundit who covers political news and current events.
Carmine Sabia

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