Oh the irony, even Jimmy Carter points out Obama’s failure

obama-carter

Jimmy Carter, the man considered by Republicans and Democrats alike as the most incompetent U.S. president in modern history, made comments that sure sounded like he called President Barack Obama incompetent over his handling of the Affordable Care Act. But if it helps, he did it in a nice way.

Carter made the observation during an interview this week with Parade Magazine.

“He’s done the best he could under the circumstances,” Carter said of Obama. “His major accomplishment was Obamacare, and the implementation of it now is questionable at best.”

The two presidents’ management styles are polar opposites. Carter was so hands-on, he reportedly kept track of who was using the White House tennis court. Obama often appears disengaged to the point of indifference. But the result is the same — ineffectiveness.

John Fund wrote in a 2010 Wall Street Journal op-ed:

But within a few months, liberals were already finding fault with [Obama’s] rhetoric. “He’s the great earnest bore at the dinner party,” wrote Michael Wolff, a contributor to Vanity Fair. “He’s cold; he’s prickly; he’s uncomfortable; he’s not funny; and he’s getting awfully tedious. He thinks it’s all about him.” That sounds like a critique of Mr. Carter.

Maureen Dowd said on a New York Times column:

As one Democratic senator complained: “The president veers between talking like a peevish professor and a scolding parent.” (Not to mention a jilted lover.) Another moaned: “We are watching him turn into Jimmy Carter right before our eyes.”

jimmy-carter_obama-sees-in-mirror1Although both men assumed the presidency during a recession, each only made matters worse. Carter’s government spending program created a new term in the lexicon of economists — “stagflation,” the state where inflation is high but growth is sluggish. Obama’s $800 billion stimulus did little but add another $800 billion to the national debt.

The Carter interview led to the inevitable question of how he hopes history will remember him. He chose to ignore his time in the White House.

“I’d like to be judged primarily by our work at the Carter Center for the last 32 years,” he told the magazine. “I don’t mean to exclude the White House. But in my more self-satisfied moments, I think about our unwavering promotion of peace and human rights.”

H/T The Daily Caller.

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Michael Dorstewitz

Michael Dorstewitz

Mike has been with BizPac Review almost from the beginning. Follow him on Twitter at @MikeBPR.
Michael Dorstewitz

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