Here comes a new Obamacare headache

As jobs programs go, it’s like a snake eating its tail.

Agencies throughout the country are lining up to try to score federal funding – millions in federal grants in Florida alone — to hire “navigators” to guide the uninsured through the red-tape labyrinth of signing up for “free” health insurance from the government, according to a report in Sunday’s Orlando Sentinel.

But it might be an exercise in futility.

obamacare stethescopeAnd with Republicans in the state House of Representatives standing firm against Medicaid expansion during the session, the job is only going to be more complicated, adding more costs the Democrats who passed this law thought they could get away without paying.

The obvious good of Obamacare doesn’t appear open to question, since the article doesn’t include any opponents, but it does include a litany of problems it’s going to involve.

One big one, obviously, will be businesses that will find it cheaper to pay the federal fine than provide health insurance to their employees. Imagine, a cost-benefit analysis in a business.

Also, since the law doesn’t cover illegal aliens – yet – it won’t change the state’s burden of paying for their emergency care.

And then there are the young – those reformers who voted for Obama in a rush of hope-and-change enthusiasm but are now likely to decide that being forced to pay for something they don’t need (insurance) to subsidize people who might or might not need it isn’t such a great deal for them. (Welcome aboard, Young Democrats.)

But from an irony standpoint. Millions are going to spent to basically explain that nothing has changed.

“The biggest problems Florida will run into is not processing all the applications, finding care and getting people enrolled, a health policy expert at George Washington University says. “It’s going to be the heartbreaking task of telling people they will get nothing.”

So, we’re going to spend millions of dollars to hire people to tell other people they’re not going to get something they don’t have now.

This is progress?

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Joe Saunders

Joe Saunders, a 25-year newspaper veteran, is a staff writer and editor for BizPac Review who lives in Tallahassee and covers capital and Florida politics. Email Joe at jpjsaunders@gmail.com.
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About Joe Saunders

Joe Saunders, a 25-year newspaper veteran, is a staff writer and editor for BizPac Review who lives in Tallahassee and covers capital and Florida politics. Email Joe at jpjsaunders@gmail.com.