Will Ann Romney consider a run for Kerry’s Senate seat?

ann romney on Fox news

photo credit Foxnews.com

Former U.S. Sen. Scott Brown’s announcement Friday that he would not seek the seat vacated by John Kerry after his November loss to Elizabeth Warren surprised and upset Massachusetts Republican leaders. It also set some to thinking outside the box — way outside the box. Their thoughts are now turning to a Sen. Romney — specifically, a Sen. Ann Romney.

Republicans who found it difficult to warm up to a Romney presidency suddenly saw the possibilities the moment his wife took the stage.

The former governor’s main shortcoming was one of messaging. He often appeared stiff and awkward on the stump, and he found it difficult to speak up for himself and his own candidacy.

His wife had no such problems. Ann was Mitt’s not-so-secret weapon.

She instinctively lit up a room the moment she stepped on stage. Furrowed brows were transformed into broad smiles and nods of agreement. And she had no problem dealing with the family “wealth issue.” She let everyone know they started out at the bottom, and everything they accumulated they did on their own.

Add the fact that she has a compelling story to tell — her battle with cancer and multiple sclerosis while raising five rambunctious boys — and that spells winner.

“I’ve had several people call me and ask about Ann Romney,” Ron Kaufman, the former governor’s longtime friend and aide, told The Boston Herald. But he was cautious: “The timing is not great, and I don’t think she sees herself as a candidate.”

Nonetheless, the idea is appealing to other Massachusetts GOP leaders.

“That would be a very interesting thing,” House Minority Leader Bradley Jones told the Herald??. “I would certainly love her to think about something like that.”

Other names thrown out were former Gov. William F. Weld, former Lt. Gov. Kerry Healey and the Romneys’ eldest son, Tagg.

As appealing as those names may be, none have the instant national recognition and almost universal charismatic appeal of an Ann Romney candidacy. I hope she gives the idea the consideration it deserves.

Read more at The Boston Herald.

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About Michael Dorstewitz

Mike has been with BizPac Review almost from the beginning. Follow him on Twitter at @MikeBPR.

  • candlewitness

    Ann Romney would be a wonderful candidate for senator. She was perfect as First Lady! She is elegant and smart. She believes in America as does her husband, who would have made a great president. I still call Ann Romney First Lady.

    The job at the top needs some class and elegance, which is a far cry to what we have now!

  • letstakepoliticsmore

    I like and respect Ann Romney. She is actually quite charming and her story is interesting one – but I would like to think that we have learned the lesson of simply putting out candidates just because they are easy on the eye, and speak well in public environments —her resume suggest she has the experience to merit consideration as a Senator. I am not re-hashing Hilary Rosen's comments suggesting that "she has never worked a day in her life" – to the contrary; she has. But the vast majority of her work, beyond raising her children, was charitable in nature (and if people refuse to accept that she would not land in charitable role given her financial and political wealthy – then they are simply disregarding basic realities). She is a good woman, and perhaps would have made exceptional First Lady – but The Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the US Senate deserves more. The Republican field might be short – but I have to believe that there are potential candidates of greater substance, if not less flashy (Ed Markey is as lack-luster as they come but at least he has credential that warrant consideration). Republicans don't need a flashy candidate; just someone with deeper credentials (and that could even come in the way of an inspiring, new fresh face). For the record, I am not a registered Republican – but someone truly interested in seeing the playing field and political discourse elevated on both sides — and simply seeking best political representation to our fine state.